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In JavaScript functions are objects, and as Mr. Crockford writes the two notations below are equivalent:

function funct1(){};

var funct = function funct1(){};

So when I treat an individual function (not the global object) as a variable that is an object, it works, and my example is illustrated below:

function testFunction(){
    var variable = "value"; 
}
testFunction.value1 = "value1";

function testFunction2(){
    var variable = "value2";    
}

alert(testFunction.value1); //returns "value1"

setTimeout(function(){
    alert("setTimeout 5001: " + testFunction.value1); //returns "value1"
    alert("setTimeout 5001 function2: " + testFunction2.value1); //returns "undefined"
},5001);

I used a setTimeout to ensure the function execution is finished (maybe the time set is not long enough for a 'real' test?).

This looks like an interesting way to store values outside of function execution (as in once a function has terminated and a value that it calculated is intended to be retrieved). Would this be correct? Is it an established coding practice?

One issue I see is there is potential for memory leaks, as once large amounts of data start to get stored and forgotten about these will hang around and cause the script to be sluggish. Is this true? Is there not the same problem with object variables (as in variables with key:value pairs)?

I have not seen this used before.

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a) use var funct = function(){…}, "function" is not a valid identifier b) Did you confuse variables (which are local-scoped) and properties (of objects)? –  Bergi Jan 28 at 19:11
1  
What is the example with testFunction2 intended to demonstrate? Notice that the setTimeout is unnecessary, your example will be executed synchronously and you don't need to "wait" for anything. –  Bergi Jan 28 at 19:14
    
What would be the point? And what's the timeout for again? –  Dave Newton Jan 28 at 19:14
    
@Bergi - Good call, I made the edit. Yes I think I might have confused them. testFucntion2 is there to show that no global item has been changed or added to, so the key:value pair added to testFucntion does not apply to testFunction2 –  user1360809 Jan 28 at 19:16
1  
@user1360809 Object are objects and subject to garbage collection like any other. Again: what's the point? –  Dave Newton Jan 28 at 19:21

1 Answer 1

I used a setTimeout to ensure the function execution is finished (maybe the time set is not long enough for a 'real' test?).

This is unnecessary. Your example code will be executed synchronously and you don't need to "wait" for anything.

This looks like an interesting way to store values outside of function execution. Is it an established coding practice?

Yes. This is often done for static values that are related to the function, which should be publicly accessible and not pollute the scope. Very common on constructors or "invokable modules".

as in once a function has terminated and a value that it calculated is intended to be retrieved. Would this be correct?

No. The value that a function has calculated should be returned. Storing it in a static place is a very bad idea, as multiple invocations of the function might interfere with each other.

One issue I see is there is potential for memory leaks, as once large amounts of data start to get stored and forgotten about these will hang around and cause the script to be sluggish. Is this true?

Yes. But you store it on non-collected properties only if you want it not to be forgotten. You simply wouldn't do this with large data.

Is there not the same problem with object variables (as in variables with key:value pairs)?

Those are called properties, but yes. The only difference is that function objects usually live longer than plain objects (due to their usage, they're not handled differently by GC)

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