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I have a rather unusual idea. I want to run a single instance of a Java EE application client inside app server, in a similar way that JMS provider is run/embedded "within" the app server, so that it is started and stopped with the app server. Why? To ease deployment and maintenance of a complex distributed Java EE system which has application client as part of its architecture.

So:

  1. There is only one application client on each server where there is app server (Glassfish).
  2. I would like to have the application client run in the same start-stop cycle as the application server, and not as a totally separate entity run under a (apache or similar) system service wrapper.

Is this possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

maybe a custom lifecycle module would do the trick?

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Good idea, I need to see will it support all I need. The problem with this idea is that, from what I know, it will run code INSIDE the app server, which defeats the purpose of application client, and I do need it since I have resources that app server cannot pool so it is not per JEE paradigm to use these resources directly from app server. –  bozo Jan 26 '10 at 20:33

To ease deployment and maintenance of a complex distributed Java EE system which has application client as part of its architecture.

I don't get your idea. But if you want to ease the deployment and maintenance, use rather Java Web Start to deploy the client application. This will simplify the deployment issue a lot. This is supported by Glassfish.

See this answer.

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This is not applicable in my case, I don't have physical users, but the application client is used to overcome some JEE issues, so it wouldn't work. But thank you for reply. –  bozo Jan 26 '10 at 20:29

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