Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I nearly have this program finished but I keep getting an extreme negative number, and can not figure out why. It subtracts and adds 5 for each call of accelerate and decelerate like it should but the initial value of speed is far too low.

//header file

#ifndef CAR_H
#define CAR_H
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cstdlib>

class Car
{
private:
    int yearModel;
    std::string make;
    int speed;
public:
    Car(int, std::string);
    int getYearModel() const
    { return yearModel; }
    std::string getMake() const
    { return make; }
    int getSpeed() const
    { return speed; }
    void accelerate();
    void brake();
};

#endif

//Implementation cpp file

 #include "Car.h"
    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;

    Car::Car(int y, string m)
    {
        yearModel = y;
        make = m;
    }

    void Car::accelerate()
    {
        speed += 5;
    }

    void Car::brake()
    {
        speed -= 5;
    }

//main program file

#include <iostream>
#include "Car.h"
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int yearModel, speed;
    string make;

    cout << "Enter the year and make of this car." << endl << endl;
    cout << "Year of Model (between 1980 and 2014):";
    cin >> yearModel;
    while ((yearModel < 1980) || (yearModel > 2014))
    {
        cout << "Invalid entry, enter a number between 1980 and 2014:";
        cin >> yearModel;
    }
    cout << "Make:";
    cin >> make;

    Car charger(yearModel, make);

    cout << "Car is at rest, currently traveling at " << charger.getSpeed() << " miles per hour, pressing accelerator." << endl << endl;

    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        charger.accelerate();
        cout << "Current speed is " << charger.getSpeed() << " miles per hour" << endl;
        system("pause");
    }

    cout << "Now pressing brake" << endl;



for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            charger.brake();
            cout << "Current speed is " << charger.getSpeed() << " miles per hour" << endl;
            system("pause");
        }


    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Since speed is never initialized or assigned anything, it's undefined behaviour to use it. –  chris Jan 28 at 22:49

1 Answer 1

You are not initializing speed in the constructor, it will not be zero initialized, it will be initialized with a indeterminate value from the memory block that the Car object is constructed in. Just initialize it to zero in the constructor and you should be fine:

Car::Car(int y, string m) : yearModel(y), make(m), speed(0) {}
                                                   ^^^^^^^^

speed is being default initialized which means it will have an indeterminate value and using it without initialization would be undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
Arbitrary would be more accurate than random; the latter has a specific statistical meaning. –  Keith Thompson Jan 28 at 23:00
    
@KeithThompson hmm, yeah good point, another user edited it when I was in the middle of making some changes. I originally used indeterminate value. –  Shafik Yaghmour Jan 28 at 23:02
    
Indeterminate is probably even better than arbitrary. –  Keith Thompson Jan 28 at 23:10
    
Thank you very much, I do feel slightly more stupid tho :p –  user3014623 Jan 29 at 1:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.