Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am working with the output of a parser that outputs a tree in the form of nested lists. Here is an example of the data:

[[['events'], [['worker_connections', '1024']]],
 [['http'],
  [['include', 'mime.types'],
   ['default_type', 'application/octet-stream'],
   ['sendfile', 'on'],
   ['keepalive_timeout', '65'],
   [['server'],
    [['listen', '8080'],
     ['server_name', 'localhost'],
     [['location', '/ '],
      [['root', 'html'], ['index', 'index.html index.htm']]],
     ['error_page', '500 502 503 504 /50x.html'],
     [['location', '= /50x.html '], [['root', 'html']]]]]]]]

Every way of converting it to key-value leads to a list hashability error. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
Can you show the dict-based tree of the same data so we can see how it should be constructed? I'm pretty sure I understand but it could be ambiguous – mhlester Jan 29 '14 at 0:10
3  
FYI I edited your question using pprint to make it readable. And I'm now much less sure about what exactly you want – mhlester Jan 29 '14 at 0:28
    
I have the feeling that data is unambiguous. It's logically a dict of strings pointing either at another dict of this kind, or at a string. If the key if pointing at a dict, it is denoted as a one-element list, otherwise as a string. I think converting it can be automated. – Alfe Jan 29 '14 at 0:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have the feeling that data is unambiguous. It's logically a dict of strings pointing either at another dict of this kind, or at a string. If the key if pointing at a dict, it is denoted as a one-element list, otherwise as a string.

This is partly guessing, of course, but if I am right, then you can convert it like this:

def convert(a):
  result = {}
  for e in a:
    if isinstance(e[0], list):  # pointing at dict
      result[e[0][0]] = convert(e[1])
    else:
      result[e[0]] = e[1]
  return result

And the result will be

{'events': {'worker_connections': '1024'},
 'http': {'default_type': 'application/octet-stream',
          'include': 'mime.types',
          'keepalive_timeout': '65',
          'sendfile': 'on',
          'server': {'error_page': '500 502 503 504 /50x.html',
                     'listen': '8080',
                     'location': {'root': 'html'},
                     'server_name': 'localhost'}}}

EDIT:

I just saw that this drops some information (when the key is a list but not a one-element list like at ['location', '/ ']). So we can use tuples as keys (they are hashable) and end up at this:

def convert(a):
  result = {}
  for e in a:
    if isinstance(e[0], list):  # pointing at dict
      result[tuple(e[0])] = convert(e[1])
    else:
      result[e[0]] = e[1]
  return result

Producing:

{('events',): {'worker_connections': '1024'},
 ('http',): {'default_type': 'application/octet-stream',
             'include': 'mime.types',
             'keepalive_timeout': '65',
             'sendfile': 'on',
             ('server',): {'error_page': '500 502 503 504 /50x.html',
                           'listen': '8080',
                           'server_name': 'localhost',
                           ('location', '/ '): {'index': 'index.html index.htm',
                                                'root': 'html'},
                           ('location', '= /50x.html '): {'root': 'html'}}}}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. Thank you. It turns out I was not pulling the single item keys from their lists before trying to use them as keys. – tengbretson Jan 29 '14 at 16:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.