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My class contains a unique pointer to an array. When the copy constructor is called, I want the class to create its own unique pointer array and just copy the contents of the old unique pointer array. I keep getting errors about converting from a const value, and I'm not sure how to get around it.

My pointer is declared under private like this:

std::unique_ptr<Manager[]> managers;

I planned to just loop through the array and copy manually, so I made this copy constructor:

Restaurant::Restaurant(const Restaurant &_r)
{
    Manager *_managers = _r.managers;
    for (int i = 0; i < MAX_MANAGERS; i++)
    {
        managers.get()[i] = _managers[i];
    }
}

It gives the const convert error on this line:

Manager *_managers = _r.managers;

I just want to make a deep copy. How can I go about it to make this work?

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1  
Isn't _r.managers a unique_ptr? You can't assign it to something else. –  juanchopanza Jan 29 at 0:23
1  
Also, why the unique_ptr if you want copy semantics? Wouldn't an std::vector<Manager> be better suited? –  juanchopanza Jan 29 at 0:30
    
he want just each class instance to have a unique_ptr to some array. Does usage of unique_ptr in a class imply a copy prohibition? If the object pointed to is indeed unique, then he don't want to make it shared_ptr, but still he want to copy class instances. –  AB_ Jan 29 at 0:37
    
@piotruś: With unique_ptr you have to do the copy manually, which means writing a copy constructor and copy assignment. vector has one built-in, so you don't have to write either of those. –  Mooing Duck Jan 29 at 0:38
    
of course appropriate copy constructor and assignment operators are needed in such case, this is what he does –  AB_ Jan 29 at 0:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason that it won't compile is that _r.managers is of type std::unique_ptr<Manager[]>, but you want to initialize a raw pointer with this.

just change it to:

Restaurant::Restaurant(const Restaurant &_r)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < MAX_MANAGERS; i++)
    {
        managers.get()[i] = _r.managers.get()[i];
    }
}

or first take a smart pointer's data (which is an array)

Manager *_managers = _r.managers.get();

and then you can use it as was before:

for (int i = 0; i < MAX_MANAGERS; i++) {
        managers.get()[i] = _managers[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
This got it to compile, but the application crashes at the assignment. I printed out the values to verify that _r is there, but they crash upon assignment attempt. –  Lucas Jan 29 at 0:48
    
probably your array is not initialized. check this, and write also assignment operator for your class Restaurant. This is necessary. At the moment it might be just: Restaurant& operator=(const Restaurant &_r) { if ( &_r != this) { for (int i = 0; i < MAX_MANAGERS; i++) { managers.get()[i] = _r.managers.get()[i]; } } return *this; } –  AB_ Jan 29 at 0:50
    
Yes, I forgot to initialize the array and I forgot to initialize the unique pointer in the class being copied to. I have it working now. Thanks. –  Lucas Jan 29 at 0:58

In the line giving you an error, managers is an std::unique_ptr<Manager[]>. You're trying to assign it to a Manager*, which won't work.

You can fix it by taking the raw pointer of of the unique_ptr, for example:

Manager *_managers = _r.managers.get();
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