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Many domains on the same web server (using the same IP), using virtual hosts can each have a separate certificate.

First, is that true? If so, then my question is:

I have several domains with WHM/cPanel, is it possible to host many different certificates (one for each domain)? If so how can I do that through the graphical front-end? Steps, please.

At the moment, I have a single certificate for the root domain, and it cascades to each other account (usually a domain).

Otherwise, can you supply an example of code (a http.conf or whatever is needed)? Since I find it difficult to put the Apache docs into practise.

Please advise if I am asking correctly.

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1 Answer 1

Many domains on the same web server (using the same IP), using virtual hosts can each have a separate certificate... First, is that true?

Yes its true. To make it work as expected, you need to enable Server Name Indication (SNI). With SNI, the client send the server name its trying to connect to in its ClientHello. The server uses it to select the proper certificate.

SNI is available in TLS 1.0 and above. Both the client and server must use it.

Prior to SNI (i.e., SSLv3), the server did not indicate the server, so the server had to serve a default certificate or a "super certificate" with every server name hosted on the server. Sometimes the "super certificate" included hundreds of unrelated domains!


I have several domains with WHM/cPanel, is it possible to host many different certificates (one for each domain)? If so how can I do that through the graphical front-end? Steps, please.

No idea. Perhaps you should ask on Super User of Server Fault.


Otherwise, can you supply an example of code (a http.conf or whatever is needed)

Perhaps you could search on your own now that you know about SNI.

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