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I've come up with this implementation of groupBy:

object Whatever
{
    def groupBy[T](in:Seq[T],p:T=>Boolean) : Map[Boolean,List[T]] = {
        var result = Map[Boolean,List[T]]()
        in.foreach(i => {
            val res = p(i)
            var existing = List[T]() // how else could I declare the reference here? If I write var existing = null I get a compile-time error.
            if(result.contains(res))
                existing = result(res)
            else {
                existing = List[T]()
            }
            existing ::= i
            result += res -> existing
        })
        return result   
    }
}

but it doesn't seem very Scalish ( is that the word I'm looking for? ) to me. Could you maybe suggest some improvements?

EDIT: after I received the "hint" about folding, I've implemented it this way:

def groupFold[T](in:Seq[T],p:T=>Boolean):Map[Boolean,List[T]] = {
        in.foldLeft(Map[Boolean,List[T]]()) ( (m,e) => {
           val res = p(e)
           m(res) = e :: m.getOrElse(res,Nil)
        })
}

What do you think?

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The fold implementation is especially useful when you have more values than Boolean has. Note that you could replace Boolean with a generic type U and the fold would still work! –  Rex Kerr Jan 26 '10 at 20:59
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to group by a predicate (ie, a function of T => Boolean), then you probably just want to do this:

in partition p

If you truly want to create a map out of it, then:

val (t, f) = in partition p
Map(true -> t, false -> f)

Then again, you may just want the exercise. In that case, the fold solution is fine.

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Very cool! Didn't know a builtin existed. Thanks Daniel! –  Tempus Jan 26 '10 at 20:55
    
@Geo You may also want to look at splitAt and span, which do something similar but with different criteria. The first divides between take and drop, while the second divides between takeWhile and dropWhile. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 26 '10 at 23:26
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Here's an example using foldLeft.

scala> def group[T, U](in: Iterable[T], f: T => U) = {
     |   in.foldLeft(Map.empty[U, List[T]]) {
     |     (map, t) =>
     |       val groupByVal = f(t)
     |       map.updated(groupByVal, t :: map.getOrElse(groupByVal, List.empty))
     |   }.mapValues(_.reverse)
     | }
group: [T,U](in: Iterable[T],f: (T) => U)java.lang.Object with scala.collection.DefaultMap[U,List[T]]

scala> val ls = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
ls: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

scala> println(group(ls, (_: Int) % 2))
Map(1 -> List(1, 3, 5), 0 -> List(2, 4))

Scala 2.8 offers this in the standard library:

scala> println(ls.groupBy((_: Int) % 2)) // Built into Scala 2.8.
Map(1 -> List(1, 3, 5), 0 -> List(2, 4))
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I'd just filter twice.

object Whatever {
  def groupBy[T](in: Seq[T], p: T => Boolean) : Map[Boolean,List[T]] = {
    Map( false -> in.filter(!p(_)).toList , true -> in.filter(p(_)).toList )
  }
}
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Really nice implementation! –  Tempus Jan 26 '10 at 20:24
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Little hint: Use folds to compute the resulting list in a functional/immutable fashion.

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