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I've got the following scenario, which I think might be quite common:

  1. There is a task (a UI command handler) which can complete either synchronously or asynchronously.

  2. Commands may arrive faster than they are getting processed.

  3. If there is already a pending task for a command, the new command handler task should be queued and processed sequentially.

  4. Each new task's result may depend on the result of the previous task.

Cancellation should be observed, but I'd like to leave it outside the scope of this question for simplicity. Also, thread-safety (concurrency) is not a requirement, but re-entrancy must be supported.

Here's a basic example of what I'm trying to achieve (as a console app, for simplicity):

using System;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var asyncOp = new AsyncOp<int>();

            Func<int, Task<int>> handleAsync = async (arg) =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine("this task arg: " + arg);

                //await Task.Delay(arg); // make it async

                return await Task.FromResult(arg); // sync
            };

            Console.WriteLine("Test #1...");
            asyncOp.RunAsync(() => handleAsync(1000));
            asyncOp.RunAsync(() => handleAsync(900));
            asyncOp.RunAsync(() => handleAsync(800));
            asyncOp.CurrentTask.Wait();

            Console.WriteLine("\nPress any key to continue to test #2...");
            Console.ReadLine();

            asyncOp.RunAsync(() =>
            {
                asyncOp.RunAsync(() => handleAsync(200));
                return handleAsync(100);
            });

            asyncOp.CurrentTask.Wait();
            Console.WriteLine("\nPress any key to exit...");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        // AsyncOp
        class AsyncOp<T>
        {
            Task<T> _pending = Task.FromResult(default(T));

            public Task<T> CurrentTask { get { return _pending; } }

            public Task<T> RunAsync(Func<Task<T>> handler)
            {
                var pending = _pending;
                Func<Task<T>> wrapper = async () =>
                {
                    // await the prev task
                    var prevResult = await pending;
                    Console.WriteLine("\nprev task result:  " + prevResult);
                    // start and await the handler
                    return await handler();
                };

                _pending = wrapper();
                return _pending;
            }
        }

    }
}

The output:

Test #1...

prev task result:  0
this task arg: 1000

prev task result:  1000
this task arg: 900

prev task result:  900
this task arg: 800

Press any key to continue to test #2...


prev task result:  800

prev task result:  800
this task arg: 200
this task arg: 100

Press any key to exit...

It works in accordance with the requirements, until re-entrancy is introduced in test #2:

asyncOp.RunAsync(() =>
{
    asyncOp.RunAsync(() => handleAsync(200));
    return handleAsync(100);
});

The desired output should be 100, 200, rather than 200, 100, because there's already a pending outer task for 100. That's obviously because the inner task executes synchronously, breaking the logic var pending = _pending; /* ... */ _pending = wrapper() for the outer task.

How to make it work for test #2, too?

One solution would be to enforce asynchrony for every task, with Task.Factory.StartNew(..., TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext(). However, I don't want to impose asynchronous execution upon the command handlers which might be synchronous internally. Also, I don't want to depend on the behavior of any particular synchronization context (i.e. relying upon that Task.Factory.StartNew should return before the created task has been actually started).

In the real-life project, I'm responsible for what AsyncOp is above, but have no control over the command handlers (i.e., whatever is inside handleAsync).

share|improve this question
1  
I've been noticing your name a lot lately on a lot of good questions and answers, it is good to have new quality users coming to the site. –  Scott Chamberlain Jan 29 at 7:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I almost forgot it's possible to construct a Task manually, without starting or scheduling it. Then, "Task.Factory.StartNew" vs "new Task(...).Start" put me back on track. I think this is one of those few cases when the Task<TResult> constructor may actually be useful, along with nested tasks (Task<Task<T>>) and Task.Unwrap():

// AsyncOp
class AsyncOp<T>
{
    Task<T> _pending = Task.FromResult(default(T));

    public Task<T> CurrentTask { get { return _pending; } }

    public Task<T> RunAsync(Func<Task<T>> handler, bool useSynchronizationContext = false)
    {
        var pending = _pending;
        Func<Task<T>> wrapper = async () =>
        {
            // await the prev task
            var prevResult = await pending;
            Console.WriteLine("\nprev task result:  " + prevResult);
            // start and await the handler
            return await handler();
        };

        var task = new Task<Task<T>>(wrapper);
        var inner = task.Unwrap();
        _pending = inner;

        task.RunSynchronously(useSynchronizationContext ?
            TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() :
            TaskScheduler.Current);

        return inner;
    }
}

The output:

Test #1...

prev task result:  0
this task arg: 1000

prev task result:  1000
this task arg: 900

prev task result:  900
this task arg: 800

Press any key to continue to test #2...


prev task result:  800
this task arg: 100

prev task result:  100
this task arg: 200

It's now also very easy to make AsyncOp thread-safe by adding a lock to protect _pending, if needed.


Updated, below is the most recent version of this pattern, which uses TaskCompletionSource and is thread-safe:

/// <summary>
/// AsyncOperation
/// By Noseratio - http://stackoverflow.com/a/21427264
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Task result type</typeparam>
class AsyncOperation<T>
{
    readonly object _lock = new Object();
    Task<T> _currentTask = null;
    CancellationTokenSource _currentCts = null;

    // a client of this class (e.g. a ViewModel) has an option 
    // to handle TaskSucceeded or TaskFailed, if needed
    public EventHandler<TaskEventArgs> TaskSucceeded = null;
    public EventHandler<TaskEventArgs> TaskFailing = null;

    public Task<T> CurrentTask
    {
        get
        {
            lock (_lock)
                return _currentTask;
        }
    }

    public bool IsCurrent(Task task)
    {
        lock (_lock)
            return task == _currentTask;
    }

    public bool IsPending
    {
        get
        {
            lock (_lock)
                return _currentTask != null && !_currentTask.IsCompleted;
        }
    }

    public bool IsCancellationRequested
    {
        get
        {
            lock (_lock)
                return _currentCts != null && _currentCts.IsCancellationRequested;
        }
    }

    public void Cancel()
    {
        lock (_lock)
        {
            if (_currentTask != null && !_currentTask.IsCompleted)
                _currentCts.Cancel();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Start the task routine and observe the result of the previous task routine
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="routine"></param>
    /// <param name="token"></param>
    /// <param name="cancelPrevious"></param>
    /// <param name="throwImmediately"></param>
    public Task<T> StartAsync(
        Func<CancellationToken, Task<T>> routine,
        CancellationToken token,
        bool cancelPrevious = true,
        bool throwImmediately = true)
    {
        Task<T> previousTask = null; // pending instance
        CancellationTokenSource previousCts = null; // pending instance CTS

        CancellationTokenSource thisCts = CancellationTokenSource.CreateLinkedTokenSource(token);
        TaskCompletionSource<T> thisTcs = new TaskCompletionSource<T>(); // this task
        CancellationToken thisToken; // this task's cancellation Token
        Task<T> routineTask = null; // as returned by routine

        lock (_lock)
        {
            // remember the _currentTask as previousTask
            previousTask = _currentTask;
            previousCts = _currentCts;

            thisToken = thisCts.Token;

            // set the new _currentTask 
            _currentTask = thisTcs.Task;
            _currentCts = thisCts;
        }

        Action startAsync = async () =>
        {
            // because startAsync is "async void" method, 
            // any exception not handled inside it
            // will be immediately thrown on the current synchronization context,
            // more details: http://stackoverflow.com/a/22395161/1768303

            // run and await this task
            try
            {
                // await the previous task instance
                if (previousTask != null)
                {
                    if (cancelPrevious)
                        previousCts.Cancel();
                    try
                    {
                        await previousTask;
                    }
                    catch (OperationCanceledException)
                    {
                        // ignore previous cancellations
                    }
                }

                thisToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

                routineTask = routine(thisToken);
                await routineTask;
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // ignore cancellation
                if (ex is OperationCanceledException)
                {
                    System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print("Task cancelled, id={0}", thisTcs.Task.Id);
                    thisTcs.SetCanceled();
                    return;
                }

                // fire TaskFailing
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print("Task failing, id={0}", thisTcs.Task.Id);
                if (this.TaskFailing != null)
                {
                    var args = new TaskEventArgs(thisTcs.Task, ex);
                    this.TaskFailing(this, args);
                    if (args.Handled)
                    {
                        // exception handled
                        // make thisTcs cancelled rather than faulted 
                        thisTcs.SetCanceled();
                        return;
                    }
                }

                // exception unhandled
                thisTcs.SetException(ex);
                if (throwImmediately)
                    throw; // rethrow on the current synchronization context

                // exception should be observed via CurrentTask.Exception
                return;
            }

            // success, fire TaskSucceeded
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print("Task succeded, id={0}", thisTcs.Task.Id);
            thisTcs.SetResult(routineTask.Result);
            if (this.TaskSucceeded != null)
                this.TaskSucceeded(this, new TaskEventArgs(thisTcs.Task));
        };

        startAsync();
        return thisTcs.Task;
    }

    // StartAsync with CancellationToken.None
    public Task<T> StartAsync(
        Func<CancellationToken, Task<T>> routine,
        bool cancelPrevious = true,
        bool throwImmediately = true)
    {
        return StartAsync(routine, CancellationToken.None, cancelPrevious: true, throwImmediately: true);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// TaskEventArgs
    /// </summary>
    public class TaskEventArgs : EventArgs
    {
        public Task<T> Task { get; private set; }
        public Exception Exception { get; private set; }
        public bool Handled { get; set; }

        public TaskEventArgs(Task<T> task, Exception exception = null)
        {
            this.Task = task;
            this.Exception = exception;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this implementation. It is exactly what I needed. Is there any reason for not exposing TaskSucceeded and TaskFailing as events? –  Tom Nov 18 at 16:14
    
@Tom, no reason, they are actually meant to be events, feel free to add the event keyword. –  Noseratio Nov 18 at 17:50

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