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I had this function:

void hex_display(void const *v_ptr, int num)
{
    uchar const *ptr = v_ptr;
    int i;
    for (i=0; i<num; i++)
    {
        if(i != 0)
        {
            if(((i%4) == 0) && ((i%16) != 0))
            {
                fprintf(fp, "\t");
            }
            if((i%16) == 0)
                fprintf(fp, "\n");
            fprintf(fp, "%02x", ptr[i]);
        }
        else
            fprintf(fp, "%02x", ptr[i]);
    }
    fprintf(fp, "\n");
}

which I converted into a macro as below:

#define hex_display(v_ptr, num)\
{\
    uchar const *ptr = v_ptr;\
    int i;\
    for (i=0; i<num; i++)\
    {\
        if(i != 0)\
        {\
            if(((i%4) == 0) && ((i%16) != 0))\
            {\
                fprintf(fp, "\t");\
            }\
            if((i%16) == 0)\
                fprintf(fp, "\n");\
            fprintf(fp, "%02x", ptr[i]);\
        }\
        else\
            fprintf(fp, "%02x", ptr[i]);\
    }\
    fprintf(fp, "\n");\
}

I have another Macro print_struct:

#define print_struct(str)  hex_display((str), sizeof(*(str)))   

ie, whenever I call print_struct, it internally calls hex_display. And each time, it gives me this warning:

warning: initialization from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]

What am I doing wrong? How do I remove this warning?

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1  
This doesn't make any sense. Is the macro form of the function actually named print_mem() but you mis-typed? –  unwind Jan 29 '14 at 9:46
    
Edited. Was a typo. –  aod Jan 29 '14 at 9:48
    
The answers explain where you went wrong in defining the macro, but IMHO your chief mistake was making it a macro to begin with :-) Why do you want it to be a macro? –  delnan Jan 29 '14 at 9:50
    
Still from your last question (number 21326738) transforming your function into a macro doesn't make any sense to me. Just don't do it. It brings you nothing, no performance gain whatever, only obfuscates your code. Really, don't. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 29 '14 at 9:51
1  
uchar const *ptr = (void *)v_ptr;\ –  BLUEPIXY Jan 29 '14 at 10:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is this line in the (rather horrible, imo) macro:

uchar const *ptr = v_ptr;

This treats v_ptr as a pointer to uchar, but if it isn't, then there's a conversion occuring which the compiler is warning about.

Add a cast:

uchar const *ptr = (uchar *) v_ptr;\
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Your function had void* argument, so types checking was not working in it. In the macro there is no void* anymore, and when you use macro with char* argument, its first line assigns char* to uchar*, which causes the warning. Change uchar* to char* or add a cast.

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