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This is happening when I try to create the entity using a Create style action in Asp.Net MVC 2.

The POCO has the following properties:

public int Id {get;set;}

[Required]
public string Message {get; set}

On the creation of the entity, the Id is set automatically, so there is no need for it on the Create action.

The ModelState says that "The Id field is required", but I haven't set that to be so. Is there something automatic going on here?

EDIT - Reason Revealed

The reason for the issue is answered by Brad Wilson via Paul Speranza in one of the comments below where he says (cheers Paul):

You're providing a value for ID, you just didn't know you were. It's in the route data of the default route ("{controller}/{action}/{id}"), and its default value is the empty string, which isn't valid for an int. Use the [Bind] attribute on your action parameter to exclude ID. My default route was: new { controller = "Customer", action = "Edit", id = " " } // Parameter defaults

EDIT - Update Model technique

I actually changed the way I did this again by using TryUpdateModel and the exclude parameter array asscoiated with that.

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Add(Venue collection)
    {
        Venue venue = new Venue();
        if (TryUpdateModel(venue, null, null, new[] { "Id" }))
        {
            _service.Add(venue);
            return RedirectToAction("Index", "Manage");
        }
        return View(collection);
    }
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1  
You might find this blog post interesting: bradwilson.typepad.com/blog/2010/01/… –  Robert Harvey Jan 26 '10 at 22:15
    
I did find it interesting. Doesn't solve this problem, but helps me think of some others I was going to have –  Dann Jan 26 '10 at 22:49
1  
Or Nullable<int>. –  takepara Jan 27 '10 at 15:46
    
How can I make "Id" type safe? Something like ()=>id ? –  helloworld Feb 28 '12 at 15:22

9 Answers 9

up vote 41 down vote accepted

You can add the attribute:

 [Bind(Exclude = "Id")] 

on the parameter in method rather than the class, that way on create you can exclude it and on edit it will still be mandatory:

public ActionResult Create([Bind(Exclude = "Id")] User u)
{
    // will exclude for create
}

public ActionResult Edit(User u)
{
    // will require for edit
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I think this will do the trick. I had seen it somewhere but couldn't find it again. Where did you find it? –  Dann Jan 27 '10 at 11:47
    
@burnt_hand - Its in a book I have (Professional MVC 1.0 off the top of my head). But also you can google "asp.net mvc bind exclude" and there are some example usages. –  Rosstified Jan 27 '10 at 22:30
    
HOW TO DEAL WITH FRONT END VALIDATION? JAVASCRIPT IS ASKING FOR 'REQUIRED' VALUES... –  Cherven Oct 18 '11 at 16:39

Great question and answers, saved my ... behind. I need to add something, though:

Instead of

[Bind(Exclude = "Id")]

I think it's better to use

[Bind(Include = "Prop1, Prop2, Prop3, etc")]

.. where Prop1, Prop2 and Prop3 are THE ONLY properties that you want to be bound at the action level.

Since this is white-listing as opposed to black-listing. White-listing is better, safer. This way you also solve the risk of over posting and under posting too. See Brad Wilson's post.

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Agreed. You can easily get haX0rd if you aren't using View Models. –  Dann Jun 15 '10 at 9:39
    
Yep. For example I have a CreateUser action on my Account controller. One of the properties of the User model is UserType which is an enum containing User, ..., Admin. If he'd be posting a hidden field called UserType and it's value "Admin" and I wouldn't use this form of Bind attribute I'd have WAY TOO MANY Admins on my site =)) –  Andrei Rînea Jun 15 '10 at 12:06

I ran into this issue with a form in which I was adding "objects" to a list dynamically. Therefore, our users were able to add, remove or update. It all worked well except for the cases when new items were created. For this reason, in my case, excluding the Id property was not an option. The solution was to make the ID Nullable:

public int? Id { get; set; }

This way existing items will have a value and new ones will have null instead. Good stuff.

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[Bind(Exclude = "Id")]
public class Hebe
{
      public int Id {get;set;}

      [Required]
      public string Message {get; set}
}

By the way above it doesnt bind the Id Property for your model on create

share|improve this answer
    
What about on Updates? –  Dann Jan 27 '10 at 1:00
    
on updates, you need to take the record and use the UpdateModel to update the record. So you have the id from the db record –  Barbaros Alp Jan 27 '10 at 11:04
    
Have a look at RM's answer to show what I mean –  Dann Jan 27 '10 at 11:46

I have the same problem, using RC2 with a POCO. If you name a property Id but do not put an validation attributes on it but IsValid says it is required. If I name a property anything but Id this does not happen. Why should I have to Exclude Id?

Thanks

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3  
And I just got this anser from Brad Wilson : You're providing a value for ID, you just didn't know you were. It's in the route data of the default route ("{controller}/{action}/{id}"), and its default value is the empty string, which isn't valid for an int. Use the [Bind] attribute on your action parameter to exclude ID. My default route was: new { controller = "Customer", action = "Edit", id = " " } // Parameter defaults –  Paul Speranza Jan 28 '10 at 19:48
    
Argh! Kidding me... Makes sense, but I would have never of found that –  Dann Jan 28 '10 at 21:17

I just created a new MVC2 project, and added a simple POCO as well as a Controller and a View. From what I understand, you're using model binding to create the object, that is

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
public class SimpleObject
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    [Required]
    public string Message { get; set; }
}

in the Controller we have

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(SimpleObject created)
{
    /// do something
}

and in the View, there is no editor for the ID field?

This should not end up in any error messages. Instead, the Id is supposed to be set to default(int) which is 0. This works for me. What version of MVC2 are you using (the RC I assume)?

Don't get me wrong: It is important to prevent the Id from being bound by the model binders since that would allow an attacker to tamper with the Id of the object. Nonetheless, the default model binder should not show the behaviour you describe.

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I had the same issue, except i had three integer fields on my model. I managed to get around it by setting all my integer properties that were erroneously required to nullable ints.

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add ? to int

[Key]
[HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)]
public int? ID { get; set; }
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In my case, the problem was coming from the fact that ID was of a type string. Changing to an int (not nullable) fixed it for me. The string type was a result of reverse engineering a badly designed database.

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