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I am writing the following methods to add and remove users from active directory in C#.

void AddUserToGroup(string userId, string groupName);
void RemoveUserFromGroup(string userId, string groupName);

How best to implement these methods?

Here is some code from CodeProject. I can't see where the AD server is specified in these examples though? (is it implicitly supplied by the .NET framework when using the LDAP protocol?). Are these examples worth following?

public void AddToGroup(string userDn, string groupDn)
{
    try
    {
        DirectoryEntry dirEntry = new DirectoryEntry("LDAP://" + groupDn);
        dirEntry.Properties["member"].Add(userDn);
        dirEntry.CommitChanges();
        dirEntry.Close();
    }
    catch (System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException E)
    {
        //doSomething with E.Message.ToString();

    }
}


public void RemoveUserFromGroup(string userDn, string groupDn)
{
    try
    {
        DirectoryEntry dirEntry = new DirectoryEntry("LDAP://" + groupDn);
        dirEntry.Properties["member"].Remove(userDn);
        dirEntry.CommitChanges();
        dirEntry.Close();
    }
    catch (System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException E)
    {
        //doSomething with E.Message.ToString();

    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Ugh. LDAP. If you're using the .Net Framework 3.5 or above, I highly recommend using the System.DirectorServices.AccountManagement namespace. That makes things so much easier.

public void AddUserToGroup(string userId, string groupName) 
{ 
    try 
    { 
        using (PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "COMPANY"))
        {
            GroupPrincipal group = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, groupName);
            group.Members.Add(pc, IdentityType.UserPrincipalName, userId);
            group.Save();
        }
    } 
    catch (System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException E) 
    { 
        //doSomething with E.Message.ToString(); 

    } 
} 

public void RemoveUserFromGroup(string userId, string groupName)
{   
    try 
    { 
        using (PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "COMPANY"))
        {
            GroupPrincipal group = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, groupName);
            group.Members.Remove(pc, IdentityType.UserPrincipalName, userId);
            group.Save();
        }
    } 
    catch (System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException E) 
    { 
        //doSomething with E.Message.ToString(); 

    }
}
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1  
System.DirectorServices.AccountManagement is only available in >= 3.5, rather than 3.0 –  regex Sep 25 '12 at 23:48
1  
Below code worked for me group.Members.Remove(UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, userId)); instead of "group.Members.Remove(pc, IdentityType.UserPrincipalName, userId);" . Note: my user id is just "USERNAME" without appending with domain name –  DRAM Feb 4 '13 at 6:02
    
Yeah, that overload works, too, it's just an extra call into the LDAP service to get the user identity before sending the remove call. Frankly, it's possible that they're equivalent in function as the API probably calls into the LDAP for the identity based on user name before doing the remove, too. –  Jacob Proffitt Feb 4 '13 at 17:36

The server is part of the groupDn variable value. For example:

LDAP://myServer/CN=MyGroup,CN=Groups,CN=MyContainer,DN=mydomain.com

The whole thing is the LDAP path for the group. The first part (myServer) is the server name.

The part after the server name (e.g. CN=...) is the DN (distinguished name) of the group.

Mike

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thanks - would you mind commenting on the code examples - do they seem reasonably canonical? –  Ben Aston Jan 26 '10 at 22:16
    
The only thing I would say is that in a good AD setup, you should not have to specify the server. The .NET AD/low level AD calls should resolve the nearest available server for you. But this is more AD/domain setup and not so much code. If your AD setup is solid, you should be able to exclude the server (e.g. LDAP://CN=MyGroup,CN=Groups,CN=MyContainer,DN=mydomain.com) –  mjmarsh Jan 26 '10 at 22:22
1  
Sorry didn't really answer your questions. yes, the examples do seem clean. If you are still unsure, I highly recommend the .NET Developer's Guide to Directory Services Programming (amazon.com/gp/product/0321350170) –  mjmarsh Jan 26 '10 at 22:29
    
ok, thanks very much –  Ben Aston Jan 26 '10 at 22:29
    
Personally, I prefer using the System.DirectorServices.AccountManagement namespace (provided you aren't stuck in an old version of the .Net framework). –  Jacob Proffitt Jan 27 '10 at 0:27

When deleting a member in public void RemoveUserFromGroup(string userDn, string groupDn)

dirEntry.Properties["member"].Remove(userDn) does not work for me.

dirEntry.Properties["member"].RemoveAt(dn.IndexOf(dn)) works.

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You can put the LDAP server in the path argument to DirectoryEntry, so "LDAP://" + ldapServer + ldapQuery.

Use the DirectoryEntry(String path, String userId, String password) if you need to authenticate

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