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I'm designing a wrapper for LWJGL and I've got a wrapper class that wraps all of the methods in a type-safe way. However, I've run into an issue which I've never really thought about before. Consider I have this method, which accepts an enum value and an int.

public static void glBindBuffer(Target target, int id) {
    GL15.glBindBuffer(target.glValue, id);
}

I have a class which handles OpenGL buffer objects in an object orientated manner. It has a static method (it's static because it handles a global state) which simply detaches a buffer object from a target. I have two options; I could either accept a BufferObject instance or a Target as a parameter, like so:

public static void detach(Target target) {
    GL.glBindBuffer(target, 0);
}

public static void detach(BufferObject bufferObject) {
    GL.glBindBuffer(bufferObject.getTarget(), 0);
}

Which is better to do?

Note: I don't want the user to have to directly call GL.glBindBuffer(..)

share|improve this question
1  
How about bufferObject.detach() if you want to use buffers in an object oriented manner? – micha Jan 29 '14 at 13:00
2  
Implement both and let one call the other one. – helpermethod Jan 29 '14 at 13:00
    
@micha The class as a whole handles buffer objects in an object orientated manner, however binding 0 to the buffer object is not specific to each buffer object. It would also give the user the idea that's you have to detach all buffer objects from the target, which is not the case. – Someone Jan 29 '14 at 13:02
    
@helpermethod Any reason why I should do that? – Someone Jan 29 '14 at 13:03
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As helpermethod mentioned, the best solution is to wrap one method to the other like this:

public static void detach(Target target) {
    GL.glBindBuffer(target, 0);
}

public static void detach(BufferObject bufferObject) {
    detach(bufferObject.getTarget());
}

So you're supporting both ways to the programmer.

And if you have to change your glBindBuffer behavior, you only have to rewrite the detach(Target) method!

share|improve this answer
    
I'll consider this. It seems to solve my concern over ease-of-use, however I'm wondering whether it might cause confusion. – Someone Jan 29 '14 at 13:11
1  
That sort of method overloading is common in libraries, shouldn't cause any confusion as the methods do the same thing. – Tim B Jan 29 '14 at 13:15
    
Okay I'll go with this then (you've convinced me :)), since the general opinion seems to be to use both. – Someone Jan 29 '14 at 13:16

I would suggest going for the first version:

public static void detach(Target target) {
    GL.glBindBuffer(target, 0);
}

The reason is that this decouples the BufferObject from the detach() method. This makes your code a little bit more flexible, and makes testing easier.

share|improve this answer
    
That was my original thought, however my argument against doing so was because of ease-of-use. – Someone Jan 29 '14 at 13:09

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