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I have an interesting problem. I have a Class Person:

public class Person
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int? Score { get; set; }
        public int NbrOfWins { get; set; }
        public int NbrOfLosses { get; set; }
        public int HighScore { get; set; }
    }

I create an Observable collection:

ObservableCollection<Person> test = new ObservableCollection<Person>();

I have an extension method to add to the observable collection:

public static void myFillTest<T>(this ObservableCollection<T> value1, T value2, int nbr)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < nbr; x++)
            {
                value1.Add(value2);
            }
        }

I add 5 items to the collection like this:

test.myFillTest(new Person { Name = "None" }, 5);

If I change the name in one instance:

test[2].Name = "John";

All of the items in the collection change, as if they were all pointing to the same thing. Any reason why this would be? By the way, this works for T of type int, and string, but not for a typeof class.

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You're adding the same reference (value2). When adding valuetypes, it works because they are not references. –  Håkan Fahlstedt Jan 29 '14 at 13:55
1  
Just as an aside using nbr for the parameter name is confusing. You should write your variable names so that if you read over your code(or someone else does) they will easily be able to tell what is. Much better would be to use "int numberofcopies", then your code is instantly more readable. value1 and value2 are also not very descriptive. –  TylerD87 Jan 29 '14 at 14:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is because the class Person is a reference type while the integer is value type. When you add the same int 5 times, it is copied, when you add person 5 times, its one instance added to 5 different indexes. You can read about reference types here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/490f96s2.aspx . You need to copy your object of type person if you want it to work as expected.

You can change your code to the following in order to always create new objects:

public static void MyFillTest<T>(this ObservableCollection<T> value1, T value2, int nbr)
{
    for (int x = 0; x < nbr; x++)
    {
        if (typeof(T).IsValueType)
        {
            value1.Add(value2);
        }
        else
        {
            if (value2 is ICloneable)
            {
                ICloneable cloneable = (ICloneable)value2;
                value1.Add((T)cloneable.Clone());
            }
        }
    }
}

public class Person : ICloneable
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int? Score { get; set; }
    public int NbrOfWins { get; set; }
    public int NbrOfLosses { get; set; }
    public int HighScore { get; set; }

    #region ICloneable Members

    public object Clone()
    {
        return new Person
        {
            Name = this.Name,
            Score = this.Score,
            NbrOfWins = this.NbrOfWins,
            NbrOfLosses = this.NbrOfLosses,
            HighScore = this.HighScore
        };
    }

    #endregion
}
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Thank you for a great answer, I had been thinking along these lines, and this works great! –  Mark W Jan 29 '14 at 16:08

new Person { Name = "None" } is only instantiated once, when you call your method. So they all reference to the same object.

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It's quite simple - you are adding value2 to the collection nbr times. Or rather, when adding an object (as you are in your example) you are adding a reference to the same object nbr times. So if you change one, you change them all.

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This extension method will do what you are trying to do:

public static void myFillTest<T>(this ObservableCollection<T> value1, Action<T> init, int nbr) where T: new()
{
   for (int x = 0; x < nbr; x++)
   {
      var value2 = new T();
      init(value2);

      value1.Add(value2);
   }
}

Call it like this:

test.myFillTest(p => p.Name = "None", 5);
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The Person object is instantiated once and its reference is used 5 times. You could overcome this by using a memberwise clone to create shallow copies of your original object.

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