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I am trying to pass an object (of class Stock) by const reference to a function of another class (called Algorithms).

//Algorithms.h
#pragma once

class Algorithms
{
public:
    Algorithms(void);
    ~Algorithms(void);
    int Algorithms::doAnalysis(const Stock&);
};

The implementation of doAnalysis is

#include "StdAfx.h"
#include "Algorithms.h"
#include "Stock.h"
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

Algorithms::Algorithms(void)
{
}

Algorithms::~Algorithms(void)
{
}

int Algorithms::doAnalysis(const Stock &S)
{
    //Do Something
    return 0;
}

The class Stock has the following constructors

public:
    Stock(std::string market, std::string symbol);
    Stock(std::string market, std::string symbol, std::string start_date, std::string  end_date);

I am getting the following error:

Error: declaration is imcompatible with "int Algorithms::doAnalysis(const<error-type> &)" declared at line 8 of  Algorithms.h

I understand that the class Stock is not being found. How should I declare the doAnalysis method in Algorithms.h so that it is found? Stock is not a derived class.

Thanks for your help. I am new to C++.

share|improve this question
    
This isn't the actual problem but, don't repeating the class name in the header declaration. in Algorithms.h change int Algorithms::doAnalysis(... to simply int doAnalysis(... –  Nathan Monteleone Jan 29 '14 at 14:35
    
In your header, add a forward declaration of Stocks. And remove Algorithms::. –  Jarod42 Jan 29 '14 at 14:35
    
I think there may be a typo. Try changing Algorithms::doAnalysis(const Stock &S) to Algorithms::doAnalysis(const Stock& S) –  Jason Jan 29 '14 at 14:38
    
@luk32: the #include "Stock.h" is in .cpp, the declaration of Stock is missing in Algorithms.h. A forward declaration suffice in this case. –  Jarod42 Jan 29 '14 at 14:44
    
@Jarod42 Yea, I figured it out and deleted my question. I am used to include all the dependencies in the header file. The way it is organized now is bizarre to me, and got me confused. –  luk32 Jan 29 '14 at 14:50

3 Answers 3

You have to add a forward declaration of the class Stock:

// Forward declaration
class Stock;

class Algorithms
{
public:
    Algorithms(void);
    ~Algorithms(void);
    int doAnalysis(const Stock&);
  //    ^^ <- Remove the Algorithms::
};

You can see here why a forward declaration is necessary in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm... don't you think that instead of forward declaration it would be better to move the inclusion of the appropriate headers to the "Algorithms.h"? It's just an opinion but I wonder what is others' take at it. –  luk32 Jan 29 '14 at 14:42
1  
it's good practice to use forward declaration whenever possible. As programs get larger the number of headers you have to include increases. It's nice to only include a header when you really have to and reduce compile time. –  Boumbles Jan 29 '14 at 14:45
    
Thanks. it worked. Just a followup question. Why should I remove Algorithms::? –  user2877289 Jan 29 '14 at 14:46
    
@user2877289 When you declare a member function within the class you do not need to use the Scope resolution operator, you will need it when you want to define the member function outside the class. –  Pierre Fourgeaud Jan 30 '14 at 10:59
1  
@luk32 Like Boumbles said, it is a good practice to use forward whenever it is possible. This post has a pretty good explanation of why using forward declaration is better. –  Pierre Fourgeaud Jan 30 '14 at 11:02

Put a forward declaration outside your class declaration:

class Stock;

class Algorithms
{
   // ...
share|improve this answer

You could also just add #include "Stock.h" in Algorithms.h file and remove the include from the cpp file. Also you don't need Algorithms:: in the declaration of doAnalysis in Algorithms.h

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