Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Java n00b here. I have been learning about packages lately and see them as really useful in managing code. However, I am (frequently) running into a problem of not being able to inherit a class from one package into a class of another package.

Here's the code of A.java which has been created in Package1:-

package Package1;
public class A
{
    private int a;

    protected void setA(int a)
    {
        this.a = a;
    }

    public int getA()
    {
        return a;
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        return String.format("a = "+a);
    }
}

The class that is inheriting is A1.java located in Package2. Its code is as follows:-

package Package2;
import Package1.A;
public class A1 extends A      // I even tried `Package1.A` but didn't have any change
{
    private int a1;

    public void setA1(int a1)
    {
        this.a1 = a1;
    }

    public int getA1()
    {
        return a1;
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        return String.format("a1 = "+a1);
    }
}

The error that I am getting is:-

A1.java:2: error: package Package1 does not exist
import Package1.A;
               ^
A1.java:3: error: cannot find symbol
public class A1 extends A
                        ^
  symbol: class A

OR

A1.java:2: error: package Package1 does not exist
import Package1.A;
               ^
A1.java:3: error: package Package1 does not exist
public class A1 extends Package1.A

I am not understanding how to solve this problem. Can you please help?

share|improve this question
1  
How are you compiling the source code? Is A on the classpath? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 29 '14 at 15:04
    
javac A1.java (inside Package2). The other way of compiling is javac -d . A1.java but that is used when A1.java is not in the package. –  kusur Jan 29 '14 at 15:05
1  
You need to provide a -cp option with the location of the class files your program depends on, ie. package1. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 29 '14 at 15:06
    
Why do I need to use classpath? I thought it depends on the access specifiers only. –  kusur Jan 29 '14 at 15:09
    
How is the compiler supposed to know where to find the class file for your class A? You need to tell it where it is. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 29 '14 at 15:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have a problem in your -cp parameter: the compiler can't find your class A

After you've understood the raw basics of classpath (and some memory settings), you should definitely use a java editor to start, you will loose a lot of time in compiling manually and understand the compiler which doesn't bring you anything as a skill.

Later you will maybe use some more sophisticated compiling tools (and a lot more than compiling when you will do "continuous integration"): yous can start looking at Gradle and Maven (Gradle is the new way of doing but many companies still use Maven, so if you think you'll search for a job learn maven, if you want to be effective, learn Gradle)

Eclipse is THE free Java editor, so that's what I recommend you : http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/packages/eclipse-ide-java-developers/keplersr1

p.s: also packages should have lower case names, avoid using numbers in your names

share|improve this answer
1  
understand the compiler which doesn't bring you anything as a skill You should absolutely know how the compiler works. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 29 '14 at 15:11
    
Why? I'm a java expert. Unless I would need to write my own compiler, I don't need to understand how it works to write code. You have tools like GUIs, maven, ant, gradle etc... that will handle compiling for you. Beleive me or not (search for Zied Hamdi on google, I worked for the biggest companies as a Java open source expert, and I don't know all the options of the compiler: the Agile way is to learn only what you need) –  Zied Hamdi Jan 29 '14 at 15:30
    
I obviously don't mean know the compiler's every detail. But I think it's important to know how classes are linked through the class path. This is true for javac as much as it is for java. Sure, IDEs and build systems help, but if you don't configure them correctly, you'll still get all the errors that are described in OP's question. It would be good to know how to fix them. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 29 '14 at 15:36
1  
That's more like it :) –  Sotirios Delimanolis Feb 3 '14 at 13:49
1  
The post started by saying: "Java n00b here" I thought you @SotiriosDelimanolis asked the question until now, that's why I was wondering why you're resisting this way instead of getting the answer :) –  Zied Hamdi Feb 3 '14 at 15:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.