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Is any particular bitwise operation (AND, OR, XOR, etc.) faster than another in C#?

The reason I ask is because I know that in hardware, most things are built using NAND gates, because a few NAND gates can replicate any other gate. Does this have any ramifications on high level programming languages? Or do all the abstraction layers in between make it so they all run at the same speed.

I realize any performance boost gained from this would be minimal, I'm just asking out of curiosity.

EDIT: Please, stop trying to explain that there is not functional reason to know this. It's literally just curiosity.

However, I am generating a HashCode by performing some bitwise operation on two numbers. It makes sense to use the least expensive/fastest operation possible. Again, it won't make any difference, I'm just curious.

EDIT: My question boils down to this: Does the fact that hardware depends on NAND gates at the lower levels have any effect on higher level processes. Would this cause a NAND to be faster than an XOR?

I ask out of curiosity about how details of hardware can impact software. It's just interesting to me.

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closed as too broad by drwelden, Damien_The_Unbeliever, 48klocs, Robert H, Servy Jan 29 '14 at 15:55

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
The performance boost is not minimal, it is infinitesimally small. Also, Code quality > Code optimization where clearly not needed. –  Pierre-Luc Pineault Jan 29 '14 at 15:45
    
Even if you weren't so many layers above the hardware that it's meaningless, .NET code runs on a variety of different processors (and even architectures) so there wouldn't be a single answer for C#. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 29 '14 at 15:48
2  
it doesn't matter, I just like understanding –  Nealon Jan 29 '14 at 15:48
    
No one is stopping you from trying to write your own benchmarks to suss this out, it's just really hard to answer in a meaningful way because it may differ across platforms and runtimes. –  48klocs Jan 29 '14 at 15:51
    
Not to try to extend this much further - the best way to write high performance code is first to set performance goals, and then to write the most straight forward method you can think of to achieve the functionality. Then you measure the performance, and then, if it's not acceptable, you profile the code to determine where to focus your efforts - or even discover that your algorithm is working at the wrong order of complexity. You don't write high performance code by micro-analysing each possible alternative at each step and trying to combine them. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 29 '14 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is any particular bitwise operation (AND, OR, XOR, etc.) faster than another in C#?

I've created a benchmark:

Random r = new Random();
int a = r.Next();
int b = r.Next();
int c = 0;
Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

sw.Start();
for (int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i++)
{
    c += a & b;
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("AND operator: {0} ticks", sw.Elapsed.Ticks);
Console.WriteLine("Result: {0}", c);
c = 0;
// The above is just to make sure that the optimizer does not optimize the loop away,
// as pointed out by johnnycrash in the comments.
sw.Restart();
for (int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i++)
{
    c += a | b;
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("OR operator: {0} ticks", sw.Elapsed.Ticks);
Console.WriteLine("Result: {0}", c);
c = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i++)
{
    c += a ^ b;
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("XOR operator: {0} ticks", sw.Elapsed.Ticks);
Console.WriteLine("Result: {0}", c);
c = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i++)
{
    c += ~a;
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("NOT operator: {0} ticks", sw.Elapsed.Ticks);
Console.WriteLine("Result: {0}", c);
c = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i++)
{
    c += a << 1;
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("Left shift operator: {0} ticks", sw.Elapsed.Ticks);
Console.WriteLine("Result: {0}", c);
c = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i++)
{
    c += a >> 1;
}
sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine("Right shift operator: {0} ticks", sw.Elapsed.Ticks);
Console.WriteLine("Result: {0}", c);

It outputs this:

AND operator: 7979680 ticks
OR operator: 7826806 ticks
XOR operator: 7826806 ticks
NOT operator: 7826806 ticks
Left shift operator: 7826806 ticks
Right shift operator: 7826806 ticks

The AND operator takes longer because it is the first loop. If I switch the AND and the OR loop for example, then the OR loop takes more time.

share|improve this answer
    
This is really helpful, thank you. –  Nealon Jan 29 '14 at 16:04
    
On my system, the optimizer pulls the operations out of the loop, so all that is being measured is the loop counter being incremented and tested. –  johnnycrash Aug 26 '14 at 0:42
    
Actually, since the resulting c is never used, the code being tested is entirely removed. –  johnnycrash Aug 26 '14 at 0:52
    
@johnnycrash Does it work if you disable optimizing? –  ProgramFOX Aug 26 '14 at 6:29
    
It works if you add 'c' to the WrtiteLine statements and leave optimizations on. Seems like you can add it to the first writeln and the optimizer keeps calculating c in all the loops. The optimizer is not that impressive... Also << 1 looks implemented with mov eax, a, add eax, eax...not using shift. –  johnnycrash Aug 26 '14 at 16:09

CPU's are synchronous logics engine, driven by a clock. These low-level operations are all performed in a single instruction.

share|improve this answer
    
An OR is likely to be done in one cycle, yes, but using an OR in code is going to potentially result in loading one or two values from memory, doing the operation, and potentially storing the result back in memory. –  Servy Jan 29 '14 at 15:50
    
That makes sense to me, though it's a slightly disappointing answer. Thanks! –  Nealon Jan 29 '14 at 15:54
    
@Servy: in what way would this make a difference to AND or XOR ? –  Yves Daoust Jan 29 '14 at 16:34
    
@YvesDaoust The fact that you're never actually doing just one of those operations; if you're measuring/comparing them you're almost certainly measuring primarily something else. –  Servy Jan 29 '14 at 16:35
    
@Nealon: actually the behavior of modern processors is so complex (pipelined execution, multiple pipelines, speculative branching & execution, caching levels) that it is quasi-nondeterministic. The same instruction can have wildly varying latencies depending on context. The true improvements are achieved by ensuring good locality, avoiding data dependencies and banning the branches. –  Yves Daoust Jan 29 '14 at 16:41

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