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What is the most efficient way to do this?

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8  
You might want to define the language. This will make a difference in the algorithm chosen. –  Adam Davis Oct 18 '08 at 1:35
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7 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Real answer: Depends on what kind of hexadecimal color value you are looking for (e.g. 565, 555, 888, 8888, etc), the amount of alpha bits, the actual color distribution (rgb vs bgr...) and a ton of other variables.

Here's a generic algorithm for most RGB values using C++ templates (straight from ScummVM).

template<class T>
uint32 RGBToColor(uint8 r, uint8 g, uint8 b) {
return T::kAlphaMask |
       (((r << T::kRedShift) >> (8 - T::kRedBits)) & T::kRedMask) |
       (((g << T::kGreenShift) >> (8 - T::kGreenBits)) & T::kGreenMask) |
       (((b << T::kBlueShift) >> (8 - T::kBlueBits)) & T::kBlueMask);
}

Here's a sample color struct for 565 (the standard format for 16 bit colors):

template<>
struct ColorMasks<565> {
enum {
	highBits    = 0xF7DEF7DE,
	lowBits     = 0x08210821,
	qhighBits   = 0xE79CE79C,
	qlowBits    = 0x18631863,


	kBytesPerPixel = 2,

	kAlphaBits  = 0,
	kRedBits    = 5,
	kGreenBits  = 6,
	kBlueBits   = 5,

	kAlphaShift = kRedBits+kGreenBits+kBlueBits,
	kRedShift   = kGreenBits+kBlueBits,
	kGreenShift = kBlueBits,
	kBlueShift  = 0,

	kAlphaMask = ((1 << kAlphaBits) - 1) << kAlphaShift,
	kRedMask   = ((1 << kRedBits) - 1) << kRedShift,
	kGreenMask = ((1 << kGreenBits) - 1) << kGreenShift,
	kBlueMask  = ((1 << kBlueBits) - 1) << kBlueShift,

	kRedBlueMask = kRedMask | kBlueMask

};
};
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In python:

def hex_to_rgb(value):
    value = value.lstrip('#')
    lv = len(value)
    return tuple(int(value[i:i+lv/3], 16) for i in range(0, lv, lv/3))

def rgb_to_hex(rgb):
    return '#%02x%02x%02x' % rgb

hex_to_rgb("#ffffff")             #==> (255, 255, 255)
hex_to_rgb("#ffffffffffff")       #==> (65535, 65535, 65535)
rgb_to_hex((255, 255, 255))       #==> '#ffffff'
rgb_to_hex((65535, 65535, 65535)) #==> '#ffffffffffff'
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4  
nice python snippet, thanks! –  Daniel Magnusson Nov 11 '09 at 14:12
1  
cool methods Jeremy! –  panchicore Feb 26 '11 at 23:21
1  
Could you explain what's happening in the formatting for rbg_to_hex? –  jpmc26 Apr 18 '13 at 1:51
    
In the function, rgb is a tuple of 3 ints. That format string is just a # followed by three %02x which just gives a zero padded 2 digit hex value of the int. –  Jeremy Cantrell Apr 19 '13 at 15:24
1  
I posted this so long ago and it's still one of my favorite chunks of python code (that I've written) –  Jeremy Cantrell Apr 19 '13 at 15:27
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just real quick:

int r = ( hexcolor >> 16 ) & 0xFF;

int g = ( hexcolor >> 8 ) & 0xFF;

int b = hexcolor & 0xFF;

int hexcolor = (r << 16) + (g << 8) + b;
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Careful of your operator precedence: + has higher precedence than << –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 18 '08 at 2:29
1  
Shouldn't those be & not &&? –  Paul Wicks May 21 '10 at 6:53
1  
Nice.. answer's been there for 1.5 years and no one caught that. –  Bill James May 21 '10 at 14:03
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Modifying Jeremy's python answer to handle short CSS rgb values like 0, #999, and #fff (which browsers would render as black, medium grey, and white):

def hex_to_rgb(value):
    value = value.lstrip('#')
    lv = len(value)
    if lv == 1:
        v = int(value, 16)*17
        return v, v, v
    if lv == 3:
        return tuple(int(value[i:i+1], 16)*17 for i in range(0, 3))
    return tuple(int(value[i:i+lv/3], 16) for i in range(0, lv, lv/3))
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A hex value is just RGB numbers represented in hexadecimal. So you just have to take each pair of hex digits and convert them to decimal.

Example:

#FF6400 = RGB(0xFF, 0x64, 0x00) = RGB(255, 100, 0)
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He wrote an equation. RGB to hex is reading right to left. Hex to RGB is reading left to right. –  Jonathan Tran Oct 18 '08 at 1:43
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#!/usr/bin/env python

import re
import sys

def hex_to_rgb(value):
  value = value.lstrip('#')
  lv = len(value)
  return tuple(int(value[i:i+lv/3], 16) for i in range(0, lv, lv/3))

def rgb_to_hex(rgb):
  rgb = eval(rgb)
  r = rgb[0]
  g = rgb[1]
  b = rgb[2]
  return '#%02X%02X%02X' % (r,g,b)

def main():
  color = raw_input("HEX [#FFFFFF] or RGB [255, 255, 255] value (no value quits program): ")
  while color:
    if re.search('\#[a-fA-F0-9][a-fA-F0-9][a-fA-F0-9][a-fA-F0-9][a-fA-F0-9][a-fA-F0-9]', color):
      converted = hex_to_rgb(color)
      print converted
    elif re.search('[0-9]{1,3}, [0-9]{1,3}, [0-9]{1,3}', color):
      converted = rgb_to_hex(color)
      print converted
    elif color == '':
      sys.exit(0)
    else:
      print 'You didn\'t enter a valid value!'
    color = raw_input("HEX [#FFFFFF] or RGB [255, 255, 255] value (no value quits program): ")

if __name__ == '__main__':
  main()
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This is a fragment of code I created for my own use in c++11. you can send hex values or strings:

    void Color::SetColor(string color) {
    // try catch will be necessary if your string is not sanitized before calling this function.
         SetColor(std::stoul(color, nullptr, 16));
    }

    void Color::SetColor(uint32_t number) {
        B = number & 0xFF;
        number>>= 8;
        G = number & 0xFF;
        number>>= 8;
        R = number & 0xFF;
    }



 // ex:
 SetColor("ffffff");
 SetColor(0xFFFFFF);
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