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I'm trying to write an app that will monitor a few mailboxes and when mail is found grab some info from each item and then once I have a list of the items I can take the appropriate actions.

But no matter how I approach it I'm hitting the Exchange enforced 255 RPC connections limit.

I'm absolutely stuck as to what is causing the error - as far as I can see I've got everything tied up in one method and am calling Marshal.ReleaseComObject.... I'm even accepting the performance hit of opening and closing the Outlook Application handle itself.

Any advice would be massively appreciated... (I can't seem to figure out why my code looks wrong in the preview so for safety's sake I've put it on pastebin too... http://pastebin.com/m637eb95)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.Office.Interop.Outlook;
using Microsoft.Office.Interop;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace HandleMailingResponses
{
    class OutlookFolderTableScraper
    {
        public List<OutlookItem> GetItemsFromFolder(string folderName)
        {
            List<OutlookItem> returnList = new List<OutlookItem>();

            Application outlookHandle = new Application();
            NameSpace outlookNamespace = outlookHandle.GetNamespace("MAPI");
            Folders rootOutlookFolders = outlookNamespace.Folders;

            outlookNamespace.Logon(null, null, null, true);

            Folder requestedRoot = enumerateFolders(rootOutlookFolders, folderName);
            Folders theseFolders = requestedRoot.Folders;
            Folder thisInbox = enumerateFolders(theseFolders, "Inbox");

            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(requestedRoot);
            requestedRoot = null;
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(rootOutlookFolders);
            rootOutlookFolders = null;

            string storeID = thisInbox.StoreID;

            Table thisTable = thisInbox.GetTable("",OlTableContents.olUserItems);

            //By default each item has the columns EntryID, Subject, CreationTime, LastModificationTime and MessageClass
            //we can add any of the other properties the MailItem or ReportItem object would have....
            Columns theseColumns = thisTable.Columns;
            theseColumns.Add("SenderEmailAddress");

            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(thisInbox);
            thisInbox = null;

            outlookNamespace.Logoff();
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(outlookNamespace);
            outlookNamespace = null;
            outlookHandle.Quit();
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(outlookHandle);
            outlookHandle = null;

            int count = 0;
            while (!thisTable.EndOfTable)
            {
                Row thisRow = thisTable.GetNextRow();
                object[] theseValues = (object[]) thisRow.GetValues();
                Console.WriteLine("processed {0}",count++);

                //get the body from this item
                string messageClass = (string)theseValues[4];
                string entryID = (string)theseValues[0];
                string body = getItemBody(entryID,storeID, messageClass);

                returnList.Add(new OutlookItem((string)theseValues[5], (string)theseValues[1], body, messageClass, entryID));
            }



            return returnList;
        }

        private string getItemBody(string entryID, string storeID, string messageClass)
        {
            Application outlookHandle = new Application();
            NameSpace outlookNamespace = outlookHandle.GetNamespace("MAPI");
            outlookNamespace.Logon(null, null, null, true);
            string body;

            if (messageClass.ToLower().StartsWith("report"))
            {
                ReportItem thisItem = (ReportItem)outlookNamespace.GetItemFromID(entryID, storeID);
                body = thisItem.Body;
                thisItem.Close(OlInspectorClose.olDiscard);
                //release this com reference
                int releaseResult;
                do
                {
                    releaseResult = Marshal.ReleaseComObject(thisItem);
                } while (releaseResult != 0);
            }
            else
            {
                MailItem thisItem = (MailItem)outlookNamespace.GetItemFromID(entryID, storeID);
                body = thisItem.Body;
                thisItem.Close(OlInspectorClose.olDiscard);
                //release this com reference
                int releaseResult;
                do
                {
                    releaseResult = Marshal.ReleaseComObject(thisItem);
                } while (releaseResult != 0);
            }

            outlookNamespace.Logoff();
            outlookNamespace = null;
            outlookHandle.Quit();
            outlookHandle = null;


            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

            return body;
        }

                    /// <summary>
        /// Iterates through an Outlook.Folders object searching for a folder with the given name
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="rootFolder">An Outlook.Folder object</param>
        /// <param name="targetFolder"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        private Folder enumerateFolders(Folders rootFolders, string targetFolder)
        {
            Folder returnFolder = null;
            System.Collections.IEnumerator thisEnumerator = rootFolders.GetEnumerator();
            while (thisEnumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                Folder f = (Folder)thisEnumerator.Current;
                string name = f.Name;
                if (targetFolder.ToLower().Equals(name.ToLower()))
                {
                    returnFolder = f;
                    break;
                }
            }
            ICustomAdapter adapter = (ICustomAdapter)thisEnumerator;
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(adapter.GetUnderlyingObject());
            adapter = null;
            return returnFolder;
        }
        }

}
share|improve this question
    
Do you call this code from multiple threads? – JP Alioto Jan 27 '10 at 0:45
    
Seems to me it would be easier coding and less resource demands if you used either the Exchange 2007 API (enabled as a web service) or a simple mailbox-access protocol like POP3 or IMAP, if the target mail server supports it. I have used both of these methods with ease before, but find that programming MS Office programs through COM was a buggy resource-hog at its best. But sadly, I can't comment much on the specific problem with this bit of code... – ewall Jan 27 '10 at 0:52
    
@JP Alioto - the code is called from a single thread and has no problems if I remove the call to the method that opens the item to get the body. @ewall - I'll look into the Exchange 07 API but I've not used it (or POP/IMAP) before and I feel so close with this solution that I'd love to fix it :) – Paul D'Ambra Jan 27 '10 at 10:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I had almost the same requirements as yours. the following sample application is really good reference:

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/rambab/OutlookIntegration10282006032802AM/OutlookIntegration.aspx

regarding "Exchange enforced 255 RPC connections limit" check these links :
http://www.dimastr.com/Redemption/faq.htm
http://www.outlookcode.com/threads.aspx?forumid=2&messageid=26321

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't really the answer but in the end I went with redemption. It massively streamlined my code and most importantly it worked. – Paul D'Ambra Feb 9 '10 at 13:22

Don't create a new Application object each time you call the function, keep it as a private member variable of your class until you no longer need it. That way you'll only need to call Namespace.Logon in your constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
@McAden - I moved the application and namespace call into the method in the hope that closing them would allow the system to correctly release the COM objects. If I remove the calls to Item.Body the application will run through all 5000+ items so I'm convinced the problem is how I'm releasing the object – Paul D'Ambra Jan 27 '10 at 10:26
    
You can call Marshal.ReleaseComObject on these objects if you make them static, in event handler on AppDomain.CurrentDomain.DomainUnload or such. AppDomain surely has such event. – Konstantin Isaev Feb 6 '13 at 20:19

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