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I am experiencing a bizarre behavior with object lifetimes in ARC. I have narrowed it down to this example:

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
@interface MyObject : NSObject
@end

@implementation MyObject
-(id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if(!self) return nil;
    NSLog(@"    MyObject init %p", self);
    return self;
}
-(void)dealloc
{
    NSLog(@"    MyObject dealloc %p", self);
}
@end

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
@implementation TLAppDelegate

-(MyObject *)createMyObject:(NSString *)unusedArg
{
    return [MyObject new];
}

-(void)someOperation
{
    NSLog(@"  Entering someOperation");
    MyObject* x = [self createMyObject:@"some message"];
    NSLog(@"  Exiting someOperation; x should be deallocated right after this...");
}

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    NSLog(@"entering applicationDidFinishLaunching");
    [self someOperation];
    [self someOperation];
    NSLog(@"exiting applicationDidFinishLaunching");
}

@end

Summary of code: applicationDidFinishLaunching calls someOperation twice in a row. someOperation creates a local object, which I would expect is deallocated when someOperation returns.

Thus here is the output I would expect:

entering applicationDidFinishLaunching
  Entering someOperation
    MyObject init 0x600000012cd0
  Exiting someOperation; x should be deallocated right after this...
    MyObject dealloc 0x600000012cd0
  Entering someOperation
    MyObject init 0x600000012cb0
  Exiting someOperation; x should be deallocated right after this...
    MyObject dealloc 0x600000012cb0
exiting applicationDidFinishLaunching

But here's the output I actually get:

entering applicationDidFinishLaunching
  Entering someOperation
    MyObject init 0x600000012cd0    <-- this object is retained until the end of the output!
  Exiting someOperation; x should be deallocated right after this...
  Entering someOperation
    MyObject init 0x600000012cb0
  Exiting someOperation; x should be deallocated right after this...
    MyObject dealloc 0x600000012cb0
exiting applicationDidFinishLaunching
    MyObject dealloc 0x600000012cd0

Why is the first object retained all the way until applicationDidFinishLaunching returns? As far as I can tell, no MyObject instance should ever live outside of someOperation. It's not a leak, because it's deallocated on the next scope.

It feels almost like the compiler inlines someOperation, merging scope with the caller. But this is also not true as (correct me if I'm wrong), the compiler cannot inline objective-C methods.

For my real project, this is causing problems in multiple areas. First in our logging class we keep track of some scope, but because of this behavior, the following log:

Generating some list {
    Calculating item #1 {
    }
    Calculating item #2 {
    }
    Calculating item #3 {
    }
}

Turns into this, which is meaningless:

Generating some list {
    Calculating item #1 {
        Calculating item #2 {
            Calculating item #3 {
            }
        }
    }
}

Also, it means we are holding on to way too much memory for no good reason.

Is there a way to make this behavior more predictable?

Note that this behavior does not change if I use __attribute__((objc_precise_lifetime)); it makes no change to the observed behavior.

share|improve this question
    
In ARC you shouldn't implement the dealloc method yourself. ARC does this for you. If you implement it yourself you break ARC, and weird things can happen. –  rednaw Jan 29 '14 at 17:12
3  
@rednaw: Of course you can implement dealloc with ARC (and it might be necessary to release resources that are not managed by ARC). You only must not call [super dealloc]. –  Martin R Jan 29 '14 at 17:22
    
@rednaw: adding on Martin comment: a good example of using dealloc with ARC is to remove an object from the a Notification Center ([[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter]removeObserver:self]). When you add an object to a Notification Center its pointer is stored as unsafe_unretained. If you don't remove it manually when ARC deallocate the object (which happens when there are no strong pointers left) the app will crash as soon as that specific notification is sent. Dealloc is a very good place where you can do this - but as said by Martin you must not call the superclass method if using ARC. –  tanzolone Jan 29 '14 at 17:46
    
Totally right you guys, sorry, I was thinking wrongly over there. –  rednaw Jan 29 '14 at 18:10
    
Check out this timely post by Wolf Rentzsch. Turns out ARC can elide most autoreleased returns if both caller and callee are ARC and agree to cooperate. –  jemmons Jan 31 '14 at 4:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

MyObject wouldn't be released at the end of someOperation because the object that createMyObject returns is retained (when created) and autoreleased (when returned).

So while someOperation subsequently assigns that object to x and retains and releases it as you'd expect, there's still that autoreleased reference from createMyObject that won't be cleared until the autorelease pool is drained (which normally happens at the end of every run loop).

If, instead of getting MyObject from createMyObject, you instantiated it directly like:

-(void)someOperation{
  NSLog(@"  Entering someOperation");
  MyObject* x = [[MyObject alloc] init];
  NSLog(@"  Exiting someOperation; x should be deallocated right after this...");
}

there won't be that autoreleased reference hanging and everything should be deallocated immediately as you expect.


Update

Martin R brings up a good point about ARC and naming conventions. By default, an object returned by a method is retained/autoreleased by ARC (if it weren't retained, it'd be dealloc'd immediately. If it weren't autoreleased, it'd leak).

There are a handful of method that, according to Cocoa naming conventions, are expected to return a "retained" object — that is, an non-autoreleased object with a +1 retain count. For these specific methods, whose names start with alloc…, copy…, init…, mutableCopy…, or new…, ARC will return a retained object. Everything else returns an autoreleased one.

share|improve this answer
    
The object returned by createMyObject is (more precisely: might be) an autoreleased object because of the ARC naming conventions. If you rename the method to newMyObject, the behaviour changes! –  Martin R Jan 29 '14 at 17:31
    
@MartinR Functions with "create" in the name are a Foundation naming convention. "create" doesn't mean anything special in Cocoa so far as I know, and ARC ignores it. –  jemmons Jan 29 '14 at 18:46
1  
My comment was a bit short, but what I actually meant is that "createObject" does not start with alloc, copy, init, mutableCopy, or new. - Note that the return value of "other" methods are not necessarily in the autorelease pool, compare clang.llvm.org/docs/…: "In the worst case, this may involve an autorelease, but callers must not assume that the value is actually in the autorelease pool." –  Martin R Jan 29 '14 at 19:09
    
Gotcha. My bad! –  jemmons Jan 29 '14 at 19:16
    
You may also see behavior differences if you change the optimization level. With optimizations on, ARC can sometimes remove the autorelease pool usage. In your case, the optimization could mean that your object dies sooner in a release build than it does in a debug build. –  Greg Parker Jan 29 '14 at 20:36

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