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I have this file which shows four columns:

chr start end transcript

like so:

chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5b  
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5c.2  
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5a  
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5b  
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5c.1  
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5c.2  
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5a  
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5b  
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5c.1  
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4  
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3  
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2a  
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2b  
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6a  
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6b  
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6c  
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3  
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2a  
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2a  

and many of the regions (described by chr start end) are repeated because they are mapping to more than 1 transcript

for instance:

chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5c.2  
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5a  
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5b  
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5c.1  

what I'd like is a code that takes lines which have columns 1,2,3 the same and takes the shortest common part of column 4 (in this case F53G12.5) from it and outputs a condensed entry, namely:

chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5

or for instance:

chrI    83280   83430   Y48G1C.10a  
chrI    90420   90570   Y48G1C.10b  
chrI    90420   90570   Y48G1C.10c  
chrI    90420   90570   Y48G1C.10a  

it should give

 chrI    83280   83430   Y48G1C.10a  
 chrI    90420   90570   Y48G1C.10  

Do you have advice for this? Many many thanks

share|improve this question
    
For us non-bionformaticians (!), do you mean find lines where columns 1,2 & 3 are all the same and then print the shortest part of column 4 that is common to all of them? –  Mark Setchell Jan 29 '14 at 19:03
    
Yes! that's exactly it. Thanks for taking a look –  margiezilla Jan 29 '14 at 19:05
    
Are there any chance to have the date like this chrI 83280 83430 Y48G1C.10a and chrI 90420 90570 Y48G1C.9a, what result you need get? –  BMW Jan 30 '14 at 2:36

7 Answers 7

I suspect that this could be done pretty tidily with Pandas, much better than this, but I'm not very familiar with Pandas yet, so... submitted without debugging.

def longest_identical_substring(words):
    result = words[0]
    for idx in range(len(words[0]), 0, -1):
        substrings = [w[:idx] for w in words]
        if max(substrings) == min(substrings): 
            result = substrings[0]
        else:
            return result

transcripts = defaultdict(list)
with open('myfile.csv') as infile:
    reader = csv.reader(infile)
    for row in reader:
        transcripts[row[:3]].append(row[3])
for ((chr, start, end), ts) in transcripts.items():
    print(chr, start, end, longest_identical_substring(ts))
share|improve this answer

One way with awk. You can pipe it to sort if needed.

Content of script.awk

(a[$1" "$2" "$3]) {
    t=0; word=""; delete w1; delete w2;
    split($4,w1,""); 
    split(a[$1" "$2" "$3],w2,"");
    t=(length($4)<length(a[$1" "$2" "$3]))?length($4):length(a[$1" "$2" "$3])
    for (x=1;x<=t;x++) { 
        if (w1[x]==w2[x]) { 
            word=word""w1[x] 
        }
    a[$1" "$2" "$3]=word
    }
    next
} 

{
    a[$1" "$2" "$3]=$4
}

END {
        for (x in a)  print x,a[x]
}

Your file:

$ cat file
chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5b
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5c.2
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5a
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5b
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5c.1
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5c.2
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5a
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5b
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5c.1
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2a
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2b
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6a
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6b
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6c
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2a
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2a

Output:

$ awk -f script.awk file
chrI 173900 174050 F56C11.6
chrI 128980 129130 F53G12.5b
chrI 182240 182390 F56C11.3
chrI 139100 139250 F53G12.3
chrI 136240 136390 F53G12.4
chrI 132280 132430 F53G12.5
chrI 163220 163370 F56C11.2
chrI 184080 184230 Y48G1BL.2a
chrI 190720 190870 Y48G1BL.2a
chrI 133600 133750 F53G12.5
share|improve this answer

Without all of the debugging here is a simple awk statement:

awk -F"." '{ trimmed=substr($2,RSTART,1);print $1"."trimmed;}' test.txt 
chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2


awk -F"." '{ trimmed=substr($2,RSTART,1);print $1"."trimmed;}' test.txt |sort|uniq
chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2

To sort by columns sort -nrk numeric reverse k for column id which in this case i passed 2 and 3

awk -F"." '{ trimmed=substr($2,RSTART,1);print $1"."trimmed;}' test.txt |sort -nrk2,3|uniq
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5

updated based on columns:

awk  '{ if( match($4, /[0-9a-zA-Z]+\.[0-9a-zA-Z]/)) {  trimmed=substr($4,RSTART,RLENGTH); } print $1"\t"$2"\t"$3"\t"trimmed;}' test.txt |sort|uniq
chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, it looks like you did it via trimming and not by looking for the longest common substring. So when I tried running it on entries with column 4 like Y48G1C.10b, Y48G1C.10c, Y48G1C.10a it gave me Y48G1C.1 instead of Y48G1C.10 –  margiezilla Jan 29 '14 at 22:11
    
The solution was given based on what output was provided. i.e. awk -F"." was where it was basing it upon hangon I will update it based on real columns –  vahid Jan 29 '14 at 22:13
    
try the last updated version it may still break since as I say it is based on what was given and your file may be totally different further down –  vahid Jan 29 '14 at 22:19

I think Python's itertools.groupby and itertools.takewhile can handle the two parts of your problem, grouping the lines by the values in the first three columns and trimming the fourth column to its common prefix.

import itertools
from operator import itemgetter

def combine(data):
    for group, group_lines in itertools.groupby(data, itemgetter(0,1,2)):
        names = [line[3] for line in group_lines]
        prefix = "".join(t[0] for t in itertools.takewhile(lambda x:len(set(x))==1,
                                                           zip(*names)))
        yield group + (prefix,)

Run it with something like:

with open(filename) as f:
    for item in combine(line.split() for line in f):
        print("{:8}{:8}{:8}{}".format(*item))

An example run:

>>> data = """chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5b
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5c.2
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5a
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5b
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5c.1
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5c.2
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5a
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5b
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5c.1
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2a
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2b
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6a
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6b
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6c
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2a
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2a""".splitlines()
>>> for item in combine(line.split() for line in data):
        print("{:8}{:8}{:8}{}".format(*item))


chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5b
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2a
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2a
share|improve this answer

Using awk

awk  '{sub(/[^0-9]+/,"",$2);NF=2} !a[$1]++' FS=. OFS=. file

chrI    128980  129130  F53G12.5
chrI    132280  132430  F53G12.5
chrI    133600  133750  F53G12.5
chrI    136240  136390  F53G12.4
chrI    139100  139250  F53G12.3
chrI    163220  163370  F56C11.2
chrI    173900  174050  F56C11.6
chrI    182240  182390  F56C11.3
chrI    184080  184230  Y48G1BL.2
chrI    190720  190870  Y48G1BL.2
share|improve this answer

Here is last night's effort finished off :-)

#!/bin/bash
sort file                                           |\
   awk '
      NR==1 {f123=$1" "$2" "$3;trans=$4;next}       # NR=1, i.e. first line

      {                                             # NR!=1, i.e. subsequent lines
         if(f123!=$1" "$2" "$3){                    # Fields 1-3 have changed
            printf "%s %s\n",f123,trans
            f123=$1" "$2" "$3;trans=$4
         }else{                                     # Fields 1-3 unchanged, do common transcript
            newtrans=$4
            x=length(newtrans)                      # Get shorter of two transcripts
            if(length(trans)<x) x=length(trans)     # Copy common part
            common=""
            for(c=1;c<=x;c++){
               if(substr(trans,c,1)==substr(newtrans,c,1))common=common""substr(trans,c,1)
            }
            trans=common
         }
      }
      END {if(common)printf "%s %s\n",f123,common}
   '

Some notes... basically the input file is sorted so records with similar char/start/end values are beside each other. This is then piped into awk. When the first line is read, fields (columns) 1 through 3 are clumped together and saved as variable "f123". As subsequent lines are read, the first 3 columns are compared against the last seen set of three. If any part of the first three columns has changed, the last line seen is output along with its transcript. If the first three columns haven't changed, then we have a new transcript to process. The shortest prefix common to the last transcript and the current one is then calculated by copying letters until one differs and the new transcript is saved for output next time columns 1 through 3 change. When we hit the last record, we may have been accumulating a new common transcript, and if we were, we output it.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You guys are great! Thanks for all the answer submissions. This is another solution using Perl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
#use Data::Dumper qw(Dumper);
use strict;
use warnings;


my $filename = $ARGV[0];
my @matrix;
my @transcripts;
my @transcript;
my %referenceTable;

my $count=0;
my $oldkey="";
my $key="";
my @keys;
my @key;
my %hash;
    open FILE,"< $filename" or die "can not open file\n";
    while (my $line=<FILE>) {
      my ($chromosome, $start, $stop, $transcript) = split("\t", $line);
        $key = $chromosome . "SPACE" . $start . "SPACE" . $stop;
        if ($oldkey ne $key) {

            $count = 0;
            $oldkey = $key;
        }
        push @{$referenceTable{$key}}, $transcript;

        $count++;
     }
my $output;
my ($k, $v); #Not @v -- $v will contain string that will be a reference to an array
while (($k, $v) = each(%referenceTable)){
 my ($chromosome, $start, $stop) = split(/SPACE/, $k);
 print "chromosome start stop \: $chromosome\t $start\t $stop \t";
 print "Common prefix \: \t ";
 $output = getleastcommonprefix(@{$v});
  print $output . "\n";
}

#print Dumper \%referenceTable;


sub getleastcommonprefix {
    my @searcharray = @_;
    my $common      = $searcharray[0];
    foreach my $index (1 .. $#searcharray) {
        $_ = $searcharray[0] . reverse $searcharray[$index];
        m/(.*)(.*)(??{quotemeta reverse $1})/s;
        if (length $1 < length $common) {
            $common = $1;
        }
    } ## end foreach my $index (1 .. $#searcharray)
    return $common;
} ## end sub getleastcommonprefix

#print 'Common prefix for file $filename [' . getleastcommonprefix(@array_of_test_names) . "]\n";
share|improve this answer

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