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Consider the following simple class X and class template Y<T> that each define four constexpr members, three of which have their return types deduced (new C++1y feature), and another subset of three that makes use of another new C++1y feature: the relaxed constexpr function that now also can have side-effects and a void return type.

Below a small experiment with the interaction of these features:

#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

struct X
{
    constexpr void fun() {}             // OK
    constexpr auto gun() {}             // OK
              auto hun() {}             // OK
    constexpr auto iun() { return 0; }  // OK
};

template<class T>
struct Y
{
    constexpr void fun() {}             // OK
  //constexpr auto gun() {}             // ERROR, why?
              auto hun() {}             // OK
    constexpr auto iun() { return 0; }  // OK
};

int main() 
{
    static_assert(std::is_same<void, decltype(std::declval<X>().fun())>::value, "");    
    static_assert(std::is_same<void, decltype(std::declval<X>().gun())>::value, "");    
    static_assert(std::is_same<void, decltype(std::declval<X>().hun())>::value, "");    
    static_assert(std::is_same<int , decltype(std::declval<X>().iun())>::value, "");    

    static_assert(std::is_same<void, decltype(std::declval<Y<X>>().fun())>::value, "");    
  //static_assert(std::is_same<void, decltype(std::declval<Y<X>>().gun())>::value, "");    
    static_assert(std::is_same<void, decltype(std::declval<Y<X>>().hun())>::value, "");    
    static_assert(std::is_same<int , decltype(std::declval<Y<X>>().iun())>::value, "");    
}

Live Example that only compiles on Clang >= 3.4 (because it is the only compiler that supports both the auto return type deduction and the relaxed constexpr functions)

The gun() function inside the class template Y<T> (but not inside the class X) generates a compiler error:

no return statement in constexpr function

Question: is the combination a constexpr function with an automatically deduced void return type inside a class template not possible as per the Standard, or is it a compiler bug in Clang?

share|improve this question
    
Can a constexpr reasonably refer to a void type?? I remember having cases where I needed to allow void as template parameter, but specializations used void* internally (not C++11 though) ... – πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 29 '14 at 19:32
2  
As a workaround, try constexpr auto gun() {return;}. Or trailing -> void, but that's redundant. – user1508519 Jan 29 '14 at 19:37
2  
@πάνταῥεῖ in C++1y, constexpr functions can have side effects (e.g. incrementing an index) as long as the overall effect of a function is seen at compile-time. Wrapping such an increment inside a small void function would give the above error. – TemplateRex Jan 29 '14 at 19:38
1  
@TemplateRex Doesn't seem to matter if its in a class. A normal template function will proc the same error, i.e. template<typename T> constexpr auto swap() {} Note that gcc does not choke on this line of code. It only chokes on the ones inside the class, template or not. – user1508519 Jan 29 '14 at 19:52
1  
This is a clang bug; I've filed it as PR18746. The problem is that Clang defers deducing the return type of gun until Y is instantiated, but then (mistakenly) thinks that it has non-void return type when checking whether it's a valid constexpr function (because the return type is auto, which is not void...). – Richard Smith Feb 5 '14 at 20:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As a workaround for a normal template function, you can do:

template<typename T> constexpr auto gun();
template<>
constexpr auto gun<void>() {}

Following the same logic, I think the following should not change your original code too much:

#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

struct X
{
    constexpr auto gun() {}             
};

template<class T>
struct Y
{
    constexpr auto gun();
};

template<>
constexpr auto Y<X>::gun() { }

int main() 
{ 
    static_assert(std::is_same<void, decltype(std::declval<Y<X>>().gun())>::value, "");    
}

Also as already stated, an empty return statement will do the trick.

constexpr auto gun() {return;}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the effort, but I think I'd rather keep the explicit return type than to use a specialization. The explicit return inside is also acceptable, so if you could please change that. – TemplateRex Jan 29 '14 at 21:11
    
@TemplateRex Made a small mistake, forgot to add constexpr for the first example. Honestly I can't figure it out. It only seems to complain if you attempt to define it without specializing it. – user1508519 Jan 29 '14 at 21:24
    
that sounds like it's some weird interaction with template instantiation – TemplateRex Jan 29 '14 at 21:25

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