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I have a strange issue involving a web call that I'm unable to actually replicate locally.

I'm testing a web service that must be set up to receive UTF-8 characters. So far, testing I've done is not proving fruitful. Here's a sample of what I sent as a parameter:

Nestlé and Mötley Crüe

But here's what I receive as a parameter:

Nestlé and Mötley Crüe

Note that this is exactly what I get when I call request.getParameter(). I've already done the necessary steps to ensure everything is being encoded as UTF-8 before it even gets to my servlet (through Tomcat 7). All of my research is telling me that this is a routine encoding issue when going from UTF-8 to ISO-8859-1. Trouble is, ISO-8859-1 is not present in any aspect of this system (system's default file encoding is UTF-8, the POST's body encoding is UTF-8).

So I figured I'd fiddle a bit with it in a local environment and try to come up with a solution. What follows is a dump of the output with some description of what's going on.

normal: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe
encoded (utf): Nestl%C3%A9+and+M%C3%B6tley+Cr%C3%BCe
encoded (iso): Nestl%E9+and+M%F6tley+Cr%FCe
normal utf bytes: [4E, 65, 73, 74, 6C, C3, A9, 20, 61, 6E, 64, 20, 4D, C3, B6, 74, 6C, 65, 79, 20, 43, 72, C3, BC, 65]
normal iso bytes: [4E, 65, 73, 74, 6C, E9, 20, 61, 6E, 64, 20, 4D, F6, 74, 6C, 65, 79, 20, 43, 72, FC, 65]
utf bytes to utf string: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe
utf bytes to iso string: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe
iso bytes to utf string: Nestl? and M?tley Cr?
iso bytes to iso string: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe

The first line is what I sent in, and what I expect to receive.

The next two are the results of using URLEncoder.encode with UTF-8 and ISO-8859-1, respectively.

The two after that are hex codes for each byte of the string in the first line. Obviously, é in UTF-8 is represented in two bytes (C3, A9) while a single byte (E9) in ISO.

The next 4 lines are some tests I did making new Strings with different encodings (literally, new String(byteArr, charset).

So this is all fine, and expected behavior, albeit locally. Plus, I notice that the UTF -> ISO line is exactly what I'm seeing, so I fiddle with the servlet code to treat it as ISO, since UTF hasn't been working. When I set up the servlet code to do this, here's my results:

description: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe
url iso enc: Nestl%E9+and+M%F6tley+Cr%FCe
url iso dec: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe
bytes (UTF): [4E, 65, 73, 74, 6C, C3, A9, 20, 61, 6E, 64, 20, 4D, C3, B6, 74, 6C, 65, 79, 20, 43, 72, C3, BC, 65]
bytes (ISO): [4E, 65, 73, 74, 6C, E9, 20, 61, 6E, 64, 20, 4D, F6, 74, 6C, 65, 79, 20, 43, 72, FC, 65]
utf bytes to utf string: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe
utf bytes to iso string: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe
iso bytes to utf string: Nestl� and M�tley Cr�
iso bytes to iso string: Nestlé and Mötley Crüe

So many differences! In this output, the second and third line is where I attempt to URL encode the value in ISO, and then decode it in ISO.

What baffles my brain right now is how in the world the system figures that byte E9 in ISO-8859-1 somehow results in é. That, and what the heck is going on in the conversion methods of the servlet code, and why are they radically different from the local example?

E9 in ISO is é

C3 in ISO is Ã

A9 in ISO is ©

E9 in UTF gives me either � or just ? according to those byte->string methods.

C3 A9 in UTF is é

Any assistance or insight would be great.

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