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I have a file containing commands like these:

doadoodle <parameters> 
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff

What I want to do is find the LAST occurrence of "doadoodle" and after that I want to append the following line:

 "rc=\$?
echo \"\$rc  is return code of last doadoodle \" 
 exit \$rc " 

The net result will look like this:

doadoodle <parameters> 
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>

rc=$?
echo "$rc  is return code of last doadoodle" 
exit $rc

wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff

I wrote this as if echo were to write to the file and all ambiguous characters had to be escaped.

 "rc=\$?
echo \"\$rc  is return code of last doadoodle \" 
 exit \$rc " 

I tried these in vain:

 sed '/doadoodle/{x;/./p;x;h;d};x;/./!{x;b};x;H;$!d;x;s/doadoodle[^\n]*\n/&  "my append stuff here.Note its got newlines inside it"\n/' file 

I tried something similar in awk, but it prints it after each "doadoodle". I'd like it after the last one. Any clue how that'd be done? Here is what I tried in awk:

tac file |  awk '{print} /^dooadoodle/&& !n {print "msg" ; n++}'

In spite of tac it will still append after the 1st occurrence of the string. Can someone do it using just shell scripting and POSIX tools? Perl sounds a bit clumsy in the middle of a shell script.

TY Sam

Update to the question by BMW. File is in the following format:

Nohup Noodldo commands > filename 2>&1&
Nohup Noodldo commands > filename 2>&1&
Nohup Noodldo commands > filename 2>&1&
wait 
Nohup Noodldo commands > filename 2>&1&
Nohup Noodldo commands > filename 2>&1&

I will be nohupping these, so it's got to find the last instance of "Nohup" and stick the previous code,

   rc=$?
echo "$rc  is return code of last doadoodle" 
exit $rc

, in there. The 2nd SED solution did work too - along with the AWK. TY, folks

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possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/7724778/… - look up sed -i to insert with the given examples –  vahid Jan 29 '14 at 22:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed '/doadoodle <parameters>/,$!b;//{x;//p};//!H;$!d;x;s//&\nrc=$?\necho "$rc  is return code of last doadoodle" \nexit $rc/' file

Print all lines as normal before the first pattern.

From the first pattern to the end of file:

If the current line contains the pattern, check the hold space for the pattern and if present print then delete the hold space (unless this happens to be the last line).

If the current line does not contain the pattern, append it to the hold space and delete it (unless it happens to be the last line).

When the current line is the last line swap to the hold space, insert the required string and print.

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If your file isnt too big then you can do this in two passes

### Store your text in a variable

$ new_stuff='rc=$?                                                                                             
echo "$rc  is return code of last doadoodle" 
exit $rc'

### Use that variable in awk one-liner

$ awk -v text="$new_stuff" '
  NR==FNR && /doadoodle/ { 
      last=NR; next 
  } 
  FNR==last { 
      print $0; printf "\n%s\n\n", text; next 
}1' file file

Output:

wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff
wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff
doadoodle <parameters> 
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>

rc=$?
echo "$rc  is return code of last doadoodle" 
exit $rc

wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff
share|improve this answer
    
this should work with the actual shell commands.I did a cursory test and all was well .TY –  user1874594 Jan 30 '14 at 8:31

One solution using :

perl -ne '
    if (m/doadoodle/) {
        printf qq|%s|, join q||, splice @lines;
        $flag = 1;
    }
    push @lines, $_;
    END { 
        if ( $flag ) { 
            printf qq|%s\n%s\n%s|, shift @lines, <<EOF, join q||, splice @lines;
rc=$?
echo "$rc  is return code of last doadoodle" 
exit $rc
EOF
        }
        else {
            printf qq|%s|, join q||, splice @lines;
        }
    }
' infile

It saves processed lines in an array and flushes it to output when found a line that matches doaddoodle. In END section it checks if any doadoodle word was found ($flag checked) and inserts the text.

The results yields:

doadoodle <parameters> 
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>
wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff
doadoodle <parameters>
doadoodle <parameters>

rc=0
echo "  is return code of last doadoodle" 
exit 

wait
some more stuff
yet some more stuff
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Using sed

sed ':a;/\ndoadoodle/!{$s/doadoodle[^\n]*/&\n\nrc=$?\necho "$rc  is return code of last doadoodle" \nexit $rc\n/;N;ba}' file
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This DOES work for the specific e.g. above , but a slight change in file content will blind away the searching component.ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah<br> if you can pl tell me what this SED is doing -I t'd be an easy change ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah wait ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah ndoadoodle blah wait in the above case it wont find ndoadoodle. I am pretty sure - its just a minor change. TY again -now as in the past. –  user1874594 Jan 30 '14 at 8:33
    
Can you please update the sample with slight change in your original question? The format in above comment are all in one line, I can't find out the difference. –  BMW Jan 30 '14 at 9:28
    
Just did . Sorry they wont let ya add \n to comments. So all comments look like fresh or stale porridge. –  user1874594 Jan 30 '14 at 13:02

Here's another perl solution:

perl -0777pe 's/(.*doadoodle[^\n]+)/$1\n\nrc=\$?\necho "\$rc  is return code of last doadoodle"\nexit \$rc\n/s' /tmp/infile
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