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I am trying to understand exactly what is and is not useful in a multiple-field index. I have read this existing question (and many more) plus other sites/resources (MySQL Performance Blog, Percona slideshares, etc.) but I'm not totally confident that what I've found on the subject is current and accurate. So please bear with me while I repeat some of what I think I know.

  • By indexing wisely, I can not only reduce how long it takes to match my query condition(s), but also reduce how long it takes to fetch the fields I want in my query result.

  • The index is just a sorted, duplicated subset of the full data, paired with pointers (MyISAM) or PKs (InnoDB), that I can search more efficiently than the full table.

  • Given the above, using an index to match my condition(s) really happens in the same way as fetching my desired result, except I created this special-purpose table (the index) that gets me an intermediate result set really quickly; and with this intermediate result set I can retrieve my final desired result set much more efficiently than by performing a full table scan.

  • Furthermore, if the index covers all the fields in my query (not just the conditions), instead of an intermediate result set, the index will give me everything I need without having to fetch any rows from the complete table.

  • InnoDB tables are clustered on the PK, so rows with consecutive PKs are likely to be stored in the same block (given many rows per block), and I can grab a range of rows with consecutive PKs fairly efficiently.

  • MyISAM tables are not clustered; there is some hidden internal row ordering that has no fixed relation to the PK (or any index), so any time I want to grab a set of rows, I may have to retrieve a different block for every single row - even if these rows have consecutive PKs.

Assuming the above is at least generally accurate, here's my puzzle. I have a slowly changing dimension table defined with the following columns (more or less) and using MyISAM:

dim_owner_ID INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
person_ID INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
raw_name VARCHAR(92) NOT NULL,
first VARCHAR(30),
middle VARCHAR(50),
last VARCHAR(30),
suffix CHAR(3),
flag CHAR(1)

Each "owner" is a unique instance of a particular individual with a particular name, so if Sue Smith changes her name to Sue Brown, that results in two rows that are the same except for the last field and the surrogate key. My understanding is that the only way to enforce this constraint internally is to do:

UNIQUE INDEX uq_owner_complete (person_ID, raw_name, first, middle, last, suffix, flag)

And that's basically going to duplicate the entire table (except for the surrogate key).

I also need to index a few other fields for quick joins and searches. While there will be some writes, and disk space is neither free nor infinite, read performance is absolutely the #1 priority here. These smaller indexes should serve very well to cover the conditions of the queries that will be run against the table, but in almost every case, the entire row needs to be selected.

With that in mind:

  • Is there any reasonable middle ground between sticking with short, single-field indexes (prefix where possible) and expanding every index to cover the entire table?

  • How would the latter be any different from storing the entire dataset five times on disk, but sorted differently each time?

  • Is there any benefit to adding the PK/surrogate ID to each of the smaller indexes in the hope that the query optimizer will be able to work some sort of index merge magic?

If this were an InnoDB index, the PK would already be there, but since it's MyISAM it's got pointers to the full rows instead. So if I'm understanding things correctly, there's no point (no pun intended) to adding the PK to any other index, unless doing so would allow the retrieval of the desired result set directly from the index. Which is not likely here.

I understand if it seems like I'm trying too hard to optimize, and maybe I am, but the tasks I need to perform using this database take weeks at a time, so every little bit helps.

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1 Answer

You have to understand one concept. An index (either InnoDB or MyiSAM, ether Primary or secondary) is a data structure that's called "B+ tree".

Each node in the B+ tree is a couple (k, v), where k is a key, v is a value. If you build index on last_name your keys will be "Smith", "Johnson", "Kuzminsky" etc.

Value in the index is some data. If the index is the secondary index then the data is a primary key values.

So if you build index on last_name each node will be a couple (last_name, id) e.g. ("Smith", 5).

Primary index is an index where k is primary key and data is all other fields.

Bearing in mind the above let me comment some points:

By indexing wisely, I can not only reduce how long it takes to match my query condition(s), but also reduce how long it takes to fetch the fields I want in my query result.

Not exactly. If your secondary index is good you can quickly find v based on you query condition. E.g. you can quickly find PK by last name.

The index is just a sorted, duplicated subset of the full data, paired with pointers (MyISAM) or PKs (InnoDB), that I can search more efficiently than the full table.

Index is B+tree where each node is a couple of indexed field(s) value(s) and PK.

Given the above, using an index to match my condition(s) really happens in the same way as fetching my desired result, except I created this special-purpose table (the index) that gets me an intermediate result set really quickly; and with this intermediate result set I can retrieve my final desired result set much more efficiently than by performing a full table scan.

Not exactly. If there were no index you'd have to scan whole table and choose only records where last_name = "Smith". But you have index (last_name, PK), so having key "Smith" you can quickly find all PK where last_name = "Smith". And then you can quickly find your full result (because you need not only the last name, but the first name too). So you're right, queries like SELECT * FROM table WHERE last_name = "Smith" are executed in two steps:

  1. Find all PK
  2. By PK find full record.

Furthermore, if the index covers all the fields in my query (not just the conditions), instead of an intermediate result set, the index will give me everything I need without having to fetch any rows from the complete table.

Exactly. If your index is actually (last_name, first_name, id) and your query is SELECT first_name WHERE last_name = "Smith" you don't do the second step. You have the first name in the secondary index, so you don't have to go to the Primary index.

InnoDB tables are clustered on the PK, so rows with consecutive PKs are likely to be stored in the same block (given many rows per block), and I can grab a range of rows with consecutive PKs fairly efficiently.

Right. Two neighbor PK values will most likely be in the same page. Well, except cases when one PK is the last value in a page and next PK value is stored in the next page. Basically, this is why B+ tree structure was invented. It's not only efficient for search but also efficient in sequential access. And until recently we had rotating hard drives.

MyISAM tables are not clustered; there is some hidden internal row ordering that has no fixed relation to the PK (or any index), so any time I want to grab a set of rows, I may have to retrieve a different block for every single row - even if these rows have consecutive PKs.

Right. If you insert new records to MyISAM table the records will be added to the end of MYD file regardless the PK order. Primary index of MyISAM table will be B+tree with pointers to records in the MYD file.

Now about your particular problem. I don't see any reason to define UNIQUE INDEX uq_owner_complete.

Is there any reasonable middle ground between sticking with short, single-field indexes (prefix where possible) and expanding every index to cover the entire table?

The best is to have the secondary index on all columns that are used in the WHERE clause, except low selective fields (like sex). The most selective fields must go first in the index. For example (last_name, eye_color) is good. (eye_color, last_name) is bad. If the covering index allows to avoid additional PK lookup, that's excellent. But if not that's acceptable too.

How would the latter be any different from storing the entire dataset five times on disk, but sorted differently each time?

Yes.

Is there any benefit to adding the PK/surrogate ID to each of the smaller indexes in the hope that the query optimizer will be able to work some sort of index merge magic?

PK is already a part of the index.( Remember, it's stored as data.) So, it makes no sense to explicitly add PK fields to the secondary index. I think (but not sure) that MyISAM secondary indexes store the PK values too (and Primary indexes do store the pointers).

To summarize:

  • Make your PK shorter as possible (surrogate PK works great)
  • Add as many indexes as you need until writes performance becomes unacceptable for you.
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Thanks for the very detailed response. I have read that MyISAM secondary indexes do not store the PK value, only the pointer. (See this answer and p. 8 of this PDF.) The purpose of uq_owner_complete is entirely to enforce the unique constraint. Without it we would have many, many duplicate rows, in some cases duplicated 12 or more times. –  AirThomas Feb 14 at 18:04
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