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I am trying to condense a data.frame that has the same column multiple times. Columns to be condensed have logical values.

The data.frame looks like this:

mydf <- data.frame (ID = c("1A", "2A", "3A", "1B", "2B", "3B"),
                A = c("N1", "N2", "N3", "N4", "N5", "N6"),
                AA = c(T, T, F, F, F, F),
                BB = c(T, T, F, F, F, F),
                AA = c(T, F, T, F, F, F),
                CC = c(T, F, T, F, T, F),
                DD = c(T, F, T, F, T, T),
                AA = c(F, F, F, F, T, F),
                EE = c(F, F, T, T, T, F),
                AA = c(F, F, F, F, F, F), check.names = FALSE)

I want to condense AA in a way that the condense column is set to TRUE if all the AA columns in one row are set to TRUE a least once. For example, in row 1A the AA columns have a sequence of TRUE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE. This means the condense column, lets call it ZZ, should have TRUE in row 1A but FALSE in row 3B.

The desired output looks like this:

mydfnew <- data.frame (ID = c("1A", "2A", "3A", "1B", "2B", "3B"),
                A = c("N1", "N2", "N3", "N4", "N5", "N6"),
                AA = c(T, T, T, F, T, F),
                BB = c(T, T, F, F, F, F),
                CC = c(T, F, T, F, T, F),
                DD = c(T, F, T, F, T, T),
                EE = c(F, F, T, T, T, F))

The AA columns are replace by the condensed ZZ column which is once again called AA. I do now know how the AA columns are called and there are multiple of such "duplicate" columns. I hope this makes sense.

Any help and pointers would be greatly appreciated.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

ding ding ding!

l <- sapply(df, is.logical)

cbind(df[!l], lapply(split(as.list(df[l]), names(df)[l]), Reduce, f = `|`))
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1  
This is rather high on my confusion quotient, but it works! – thelatemail Jan 30 '14 at 0:42
    
It eludes me how this can be so easy but it worked on my data.frame with 10.000 columns. I have taken this as my accepted answer for its simplicity and efficiency. Thanks a lot! – Rkook Jan 30 '14 at 2:50

A solution for all columns (except the first two):

res <- tapply(names(mydf)[-(1:2)], names(mydf)[-(1:2)], FUN = function(n)
        as.logical(rowSums(mydf[names(mydf) %in% n[1]]))) 

cbind(mydf[1:2], do.call(cbind, res))


  ID  A    AA    BB    CC    DD    EE
1 1A N1  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
2 2A N2  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
3 3A N3  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
4 1B N4 FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
5 2B N5  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
6 3B N6 FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
share|improve this answer
    
+1, much simpler than mine – BrodieG Jan 29 '14 at 23:59
    
Thanks a lot for that. Works perfectly on my data as the first columns are identifying columns. – Rkook Jan 30 '14 at 2:21

As a start:

rowSums(mydf[,colnames(mydf) == 'AA']) > 0
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Essentially a variation on @SvenHohenstein's solution:

unq <- unique(names(mydf)[-(1:2)])
res <- setNames(lapply(unq, function(x) rowSums(mydf[names(mydf)==x])>0 ),unq)
cbind(mydf[1:2],res)

#  ID  A    AA    BB    CC    DD    EE
#1 1A N1  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
#2 2A N2  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
#3 3A N3  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
#4 1B N4 FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
#5 2B N5  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
#6 3B N6 FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
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I thought this was going to be real straightforward, but it turns out melt doesn't do great when you have repeated column names, so this gets a bit finicky:

library(data.table)
library(reshape2)
df.names <- names(mydf)
var.names <- paste0("V", 1:(length(df.names) - 2))
real.names <- df.names[-(1:2)]
names(mydf) <- c(df.names[1:2], var.names)
dt <- data.table(melt(mydf, id.vars=c("ID", "A")))
dt[, variable:=real.names[match(variable, var.names)]]
dcast(
  dt[, list(value=any(value)), by=list(ID, A, variable)], 
  ID + A ~ variable
)
#   ID  A    AA    BB    CC    DD    EE
# 1 1A N1  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
# 2 1B N4 FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
# 3 2A N2  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
# 4 2B N5  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
# 5 3A N3  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
# 6 3B N6 FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE    

Note result set is not in exact same order as yours, but it should be easy to re-order if it matters. Note I think N4 is wrong in your desired output.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you are right N4 had the wrong desired result. I have edited it in the question. – Rkook Jan 30 '14 at 2:56

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