Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am learning list comprehension and it is very fast, But I am trying to insert the value into sublist and it is showing None for that sublist. Here is I am trying,

def tester(lst):
      print [ x if x%2 else x*100 for x in range(1, 10) ] # It is working
      #output: [1, 200, 3, 400, 5, 600, 7, 800, 9]
      print [ls.insert(2,"Null") for ls in lst]
      #output: [None, None]


lst = [['a','c','d'],['1','2','3']]

tester(lst)

Why it is showing [None, None] ? and Why it is not showing [['a','c','d', 'Null'],['1','2','3', 'Null']]

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

list.insert modifies the list in-place and returns None.

>>> lis = range(5)
>>> repr(lis.insert(2, 'null')) # returns None
'None'
>>> lis                         # But the list is affected.
[0, 1, 'null', 2, 3, 4]

Use a simple for-loop here:

for ls in lst:
    ls.insert(2, "Null") 

You can do it with a list-comprehension too, but I'd prefer the normal loop version:

>>> lst = [range(5) for _ in range(5)]
>>> [ls for ls in lst if not ls.insert(2, 'null')]
[[0, 1, 'null', 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 'null', 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 'null', 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 'null', 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 'null', 2, 3, 4]]

Here when the if-condition is checked the item is inserted to the current list, and as list.insert returns None, not None is always True.

Update:

To update the list objects based on conditions you need to use a ternary expression:

>>> lst = [['a','c','d'],['1','2','3'], [1, 2, 3, 4]]
>>> [ls if (len(ls) == 3 and not ls.insert(2, 'null')) else ls for ls in lst]
[['a', 'c', 'null', 'd'], ['1', '2', 'null', '3'], [1, 2, 3, 4]]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a simple for-loop. If you use a list comprehension & discard the resulting list, you're doing it wrong. –  Matthew Trevor Jan 30 '14 at 4:47
    
@Ashwini Chaudhary thanks for your time answer the question, When I try this [ls for ls in lst if (len(ls)==3) ls.insert(2,"Null")], But the error was raised. –  codeimplementer Jan 30 '14 at 5:23
    
@codeimplementer You need to use and there: if len(ls)==3 and not ls.insert(2,"Null") –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 30 '14 at 5:57
    
@codeimplementer I've updated my answer, I guess that is what you're looking for. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 30 '14 at 6:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.