Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm familiar with both the Wizard Book:

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

and the Dragon Book:

Compilers: Principles Techniques and Tools

However, I'm curious to find out which other classic academic textbooks people would consider essential reading for a programmer.

share|improve this question
1  
I for one would not consider the dragon book essential. –  anon Jan 27 '10 at 18:05
    
many similar questions are already asked. Also, this should be CW to encourage people to upvote and downvote freely. –  Norman Ramsey Jan 28 '10 at 1:19
    
Do you maybe want to reference exact duplicate you marked the question as? I couldn't find similar. –  Jon Jan 28 '10 at 1:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the word is "classic", then I'd say the collection from Knuth's "The Art of Computer Programming".

share|improve this answer

Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation

Also see:
ACM Classic Books Series
This is a list of classic computer science books that was arrived as a result of the poll ACM conducted among its members.

share|improve this answer

A must have 'Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software'

aka Gang Of Four

http://www.amazon.com/Design-Patterns-Elements-Reusable-Object-Oriented/dp/0201633612/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264576409&sr=8-6

share|improve this answer

I would say the following is a classic!!

Brian Kernighan book on C Language

http://www.amazon.co.uk/C-Programming-Language-2nd/dp/0131103628/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264614901&sr=8-1

It was the first book I had to learn programming!

share|improve this answer

Look at Academlib.com

You can find Classic Academic Textbooks here. But just humanities sciences, like management etextbooks or Economics etextbooks for example

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.