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What's going on here:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
int main(void) {
    printf("17^12 = %lf\n", pow(17, 12));
    printf("17^13 = %lf\n", pow(17, 13));
    printf("17^14 = %lf\n", pow(17, 14));
}

I get this output:

17^12 = 582622237229761.000000
17^13 = 9904578032905936.000000
17^14 = 168377826559400928.000000

13 and 14 do not match with wolfram alpa cf:

12: 582622237229761.000000
    582622237229761

13: 9904578032905936.000000
    9904578032905937

14: 168377826559400928.000000
    168377826559400929

Moreover, it's not wrong by some strange fraction - it's wrong by exactly one!

If this is down to me reaching the limits of what pow() can do for me, is there an alternative that can calculate this? I need a function that can calculate x^y, where x^y is always less than ULLONG_MAX.

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43  
3  
yes but exactly one? –  trideceth12 Jan 30 at 9:45
9  
Fun fact: this loop does not terminate: for (float f = 0; f < INT_MAX; f++) { } –  ntoskrnl Jan 30 at 12:59
3  
The l in %lf does not do anything. You are printing doubles, and if your compilation platforms maps double to IEEE 754's double-precision format, you will never print 9904578032905937.0 this way, as there is no such double-precision number. –  Pascal Cuoq Jan 30 at 14:36
5  
@ntoskrnl: might not terminate. It did on Crays and systems where int was 16 bits. –  MSalters Jan 30 at 15:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 64 down vote accepted

pow works with double numbers. These represent numbers of the form s * 2^e where s is a 53 bit integer. Therefore double can store all integers below 2^53, but only some integers above 2^53. In particular, it can only represent even numbers > 2^53, since for e > 0 the value is always a multiple of 2.

17^13 needs 54 bits to represent exactly, so e is set to 1 and hence the calculated value becomes even number. The correct value is odd, so it's not surprising it's off by one. Likewise, 17^14 takes 58 bits to represent. That it too is off by one is a lucky coincidence (as long as you don't apply too much number theory), it just happens to be one off from a multiple of 32, which is the granularity at which double numbers of that magnitude are rounded.

For exact integer exponentiation, you should use integers all the way. Write your own double-free exponentiation routine. Use exponentiation by squaring if y can be large, but I assume it's always less than 64, making this issue moot.

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2  
@trideceth12 That is the obvious way you should be doing. And it's too simple to constitute reinventing the wheel. Given that you're constrained into the range of a 64 bit integer and x and y are integers, there are neither precision issues to solve nor big performance challenges that call for sophisticated algorithms (10, 20 or even 60 multiplications are cheap, cheaper than any I/O for example). –  delnan Jan 30 at 9:58
8  
A bit of modular arithmetic: 17 % 16 = 1, so 17^n % 16 = 1 (meaning the four least significant bits in the binary representation of 17^n will always be 0001). –  tom Jan 30 at 10:10
3  
@tom That's what I meant by applying too much number theory +1 Though it's not a full explanation, as it needs to be 1 (as opposed to 17) modulo 32 to be off by one. There probably isn't much of a pattern though, 17^15 is more-than-one off. –  delnan Jan 30 at 10:22
5  
@delnan I missed 17^14 having five truncated bits. But 17^2 % 32 = 1, so 17^14 % 32 = (17^2)^7 % 32 = 1. –  tom Jan 30 at 10:40
5  
@trideceth12 There is the square-and-multiply algo which has runtime logarithmic in the exponent instead of linear. –  CodesInChaos Jan 30 at 16:00

The numbers you get are too big to be represented with a double accurately. A double-precision floating-point number has essentially 53 significant binary digits and can represent all integers up to 2^53 or 9,007,199,254,740,992.

For higher numbers, the last digits get truncated and the result of your calculation is rounded to the next number that can be represented as a double. For 17^13, which is only slightly above the limit, this is the closest even number. For numbers greater than 2^54 this is the closest number that is divisible by four, and so on.

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2  
Ahh.. the closest even number makes sense –  trideceth12 Jan 30 at 9:47

If your input arguments are non-negative integers, then you can implement your own pow.

Recursively:

unsigned long long pow(unsigned long long x,unsigned int y)
{
    if (y == 0)
        return 1;
    if (y == 1)
        return x;
    return pow(x,y/2)*pow(x,y-y/2);
}

Iteratively:

unsigned long long pow(unsigned long long x,unsigned int y)
{
    unsigned long long res = 1;
    while (y--)
        res *= x;
    return res;
}

Efficiently:

unsigned long long pow(unsigned long long x,unsigned int y)
{
    unsigned long long res = 1;
    while (y > 0)
    {
        if (y & 1)
            res *= x;
        y >>= 1;
        x *= x;
    }
    return res;
}
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9  
The recursive version is useless because it doesn't reuse the answer. One recursive call is sufficient: root = y ? pow(x, y / 2) : 1; return root * root * (y&1 ? x : 1); –  tom Jan 30 at 10:32
    
@chux: Just noticed that missing if (y == 1)... I can't believe it's been there for so long without me noticing it. Thanks a lot!!!!! :) –  barak manos Aug 26 at 17:19
    
@tom Right you are. Missed the "eventually multiplies by pow(0, 1)". –  chux Sep 6 at 14:39

A small addition to other good answers: under x86 architecture there is usually available x87 80-bit extended format, which is supported by most C compilers via the long double type. This format allows to operate with integer numbers up to 2^64 without gaps.

There is analogue of pow() in <math.h> which is intended for operating with long double numbers - powl(). It should also be noticed that the format specifier for the long double values is other than for double ones - %Lf. So the correct program using the long double type looks like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
int main(void) {
    printf("17^12 = %Lf\n", powl(17, 12));
    printf("17^13 = %Lf\n", powl(17, 13));
    printf("17^14 = %Lf\n", powl(17, 14));
}

As Stephen Canon noted in comments there is no guarantee that this program should give exact result.

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2  
(a) The length modifier for long double is L, not ll. (b) There’s no guarantee that powl delivers a sub-ulp accurate result (which is necessary for this to give the “right” answer); on some platforms it doesn’t. –  Stephen Canon Jan 30 at 20:25
    
@StephenCanon (a) llf is nonstandard variant, it is my error, thank you. (b) Of course you are right, but I didn't write that this program would give correct results. –  Constructor Jan 30 at 20:36
    
I'd even point out that powl gives wildly wrong results on many implementations. –  tmyklebu Jan 30 at 20:56
    
@tmyklebu Even if CPU supports x87 instruction set? –  Constructor Jan 30 at 21:06
1  
Thanks for the tip.. I have a reasonably extensive unit testing suite (which is what turned up the original problem), So It's good to have another option - and if it passes my tests it works perfectly every time for every possible input, right? ;) –  trideceth12 Jan 31 at 4:37

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