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I've being studying the different possibilities to add values in a heap in Java. I'm using the PriorityHeap class. When I noticed slow running times in my application, I decided to give this a look. I'm adding several thousand and, sometimes, millions of custom entries (I have a custom class which has 3 fields: a int, a LongWritable and Text, both from hadoop.io; this instrumentation agent says my records have 200 bytes in average).

Is it obvious that using addAll() instead of add() method to put entries in the heap will improve performance, simply because this would avoid several heapify operations?

I tried with different strategies using the following new example:

package Sorting;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.PriorityQueue;

public class Main {

private static final int HEAP_SIZE = 1000000;
private static final int BULK_LIST_SIZE = HEAP_SIZE / 10;

private static String normal;
private static String bulk;
private static String fullBulk;

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
normal = "";
bulk = "";
fullBulk = "";
long time = 0;

warmup();

normal = "";
bulk = "";
fullBulk = "";

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {

    // Normal add time
    System.out.println("Normal starts...");
    time = normalExecution();
    System.out.println("Normal add time " + time);

    // Bulk add time
    System.out.println("Bulk starts...");
    time = bulk();
    System.out.println("Bulk add time " + time);

    // Bulk add time with list and heap with same size
    System.out.println("Full Bulk starts...");
    time = fullBulk();
    System.out.println("Full Bulk add time " + time);
}
System.out.println(normal);
System.out.println(bulk);
System.out.println(fullBulk);

}

private static long fullBulk() {
long time;
long start;
List<Double> fullBulkList = new ArrayList<Double>(HEAP_SIZE);
PriorityQueue<Double> fullBulkHeap = new PriorityQueue<Double>(HEAP_SIZE);

start = System.nanoTime();
for (int j = 0; j < HEAP_SIZE; j++) {
    if (fullBulkList.size() == HEAP_SIZE) {
    fullBulkHeap.addAll(fullBulkList);
    fullBulkList.clear();
    }
}
fullBulkHeap.addAll(fullBulkList);
time = System.nanoTime() - start;

fullBulk = fullBulk + "\t" + time;
fullBulkList = null;
fullBulkHeap = null;
return time;
}

private static long bulk() {
long time;
long start;
List<Double> bulkList = new ArrayList<Double>(BULK_LIST_SIZE);
PriorityQueue<Double> bulkHeap = new PriorityQueue<Double>(HEAP_SIZE);
start = System.nanoTime();
for (int j = 0; j < HEAP_SIZE; j++) {
    if (bulkList.size() == BULK_LIST_SIZE) {
    bulkHeap.addAll(bulkList);
    bulkList.clear();
    }
}
bulkHeap.addAll(bulkList);
time = System.nanoTime() - start;
bulk = bulk + "\t" + time;
bulkList = null;
bulkHeap = null;
return time;
}

private static long normalExecution() {

long time;
long start;
PriorityQueue<Double> normalHeap = new PriorityQueue<Double>(HEAP_SIZE);
start = System.nanoTime();
for (int j = 0; j < HEAP_SIZE; j++) {
    normalHeap.add(Double.MAX_VALUE);
}
time = System.nanoTime() - start;
normal = normal + "\t" + time;
normalHeap = null;
return time;
}

private static void warmup() {
System.out.println("Starting warmup");
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    normalExecution();
    bulk();
    fullBulk();
}
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {

    bulk();
    fullBulk();
    normalExecution();
}
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {

    fullBulk();
    normalExecution();
    bulk();
}
System.out.println("Warmup finished");
}

}

Which resulted in the following results:

enter image description here

The huge peak in the 11th iteration of the normal add method is explained by a GC call: [GC 1347684K->31354K(1446400K), 0.0331610 secs].

Mediam values are 16049669, 783724 and 800276 respectively. ST dev are 3512492.89, 244374.17 and 33344.17.

share|improve this question
    
Just from an algorithmic point of view, even if there would be a batch insert for heaps, it would need to sift-up every newly added element to retain the heap property. Your benchmark is also flawed (your bottleneck is IO not the heap), please look at stackoverflow.com/questions/504103/… –  Thomas Jungblut Jan 30 at 20:53
    
Thanks very much for the link. –  Pedro Dusso Jan 31 at 8:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

PriorityQueue does not override the method addAll inherited from AbstractQueue.

In AbstractQueue this method looks like this.

public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends E> c) {
    if (c == null)
        throw new NullPointerException();
    if (c == this)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    boolean modified = false;
    for (E e : c)
        if (add(e))
            modified = true;
    return modified;
}

As you can see, it just loops and calls add.

So I don't think addAll will improve anything compared to add.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with you, but could this internal adding element loop cause less context switch than if it would be outside the object? I re-run the test following some of the advice from the link in the question comments and the results are clear... –  Pedro Dusso Jan 31 at 8:55
    
@PedroDusso do you even know what a context switch is? Your benchmark is bogus because you are having IO access in your code. The first invocation probably reads from disk, while the others are cached. This is where the difference comes from. –  Thomas Jungblut Jan 31 at 10:15
    
@ThomasJungblut Yes, I do. it was bad expression for the case. What I mean is that maybe a cache locality issue. The call to add from the addall inside the class is closer than if called from outside. But I agree if your algorithmic point of view, nevertheless. –  Pedro Dusso Jan 31 at 13:58

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