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If I am using WeakReferences to allow listeners to not hold onto the surrounding object. Should my client facing API enforce the use of weak references, or is it something I should deal with internally and not expose this complication? Also what is the impact of testing. i.e. I could mock a listener but if I 'new up' the weak reference inside the listener I wouldn't be able to test the flow when the WeakRefernece becomes null.

WeakReference JavaDoc

For instance:

interface TaskListener {
    void callback();
}

Don't expose the WeakReference

class MyClass {

    private TaskListener;

    public void runTask() {
        taskListener = new TaskListener(){

            @Override
            public void callback() {

            }
        }
        task.setListener(taskListener);
        task.run();
    }

}

impl:

class Task {

    public void setListener(TaskListener listener) {
        this.listener = new WeakReference<TaskListener>(listener);    
    }

}

Do expose the WeakReference:

class MyClass {

    private WeakReference<TaskListener>;

    public void runTask() {
        taskListener = new WeakReference<TaskListener>(new TaskListener(){

            @Override
            public void callback() {

            }
        })
        task.setListener(taskListener);
        task.run();
    }

}

impl:

class Task {

    public void setListener(WeakReference<TaskListener> listener) {
        this.listener = listener;
    }

}
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1  
You should probably think about this again - new WeakReference<>(new Whatever()) could result in the weak reference referencing nothing since the newly created object is not strongly referenced anywhere (unless it creates a reference to itself somewhere in its constructor). –  Njol Jan 30 '14 at 13:50
    
@Njol Yeah that is just the example, I would hold a reference in the class. I can update –  Blundell Jan 30 '14 at 13:51
1  
I'd go for the first one as you probably want to keep your API as clean and easy to use as possible. You should however document that internally WeakReferences are used to manage listeners. –  Roman Vottner Jan 30 '14 at 14:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The weak reference is an implementation detail and just adds complication for the API users for no reason. Unless they are every going to do with the weak reference just have them pass the object in and do the weak reference yourself.

Be aware though that there are limitations with this pattern, I tried it myself before and discovered it was actually more hindrance than help. Because the weak references get dropped I couldn't actually just add a listener and then forget about it - I had to also keep a reference to that listener elsewhere just to stop it getting GC.

This may not apply to your use-case but in many cases listeners are implemented as anonymous inner classes and they are attached to listen but no other reference is then kept to them. That is not possible if you store them using weak references.

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"I had to also keep a reference to that listener elsewhere just to stop it getting GC" Keeping another reference to the listener? Doesn't it make the WeakReference senseless then? –  Xavi Rigau Jan 30 '14 at 13:59
    
Yes. That's why I removed the weak references. However there are cases where it might be useful. If you have business objects that are being used elsewhere and are also listeners then you might want to add them to listen to things but still have them GCd. Even that isn't ideal though as you could drop all references to something but it would still be receiving events for an unknown time afterwards and wasting resources. Basically in the end I decided that weak references just aren't useful for listeners. –  Tim B Jan 30 '14 at 14:05
    
Yeah it makes sense –  Xavi Rigau Jan 30 '14 at 14:25

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