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In the default asp.net mvc project, in the Site.Master file, there is a menu navigation list:

<div id="menucontainer">
    <ul id="menu">              
        <li><%= Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")%></li>
        <li><%= Html.ActionLink("About Us", "About", "Home")%></li>
    </ul>
</div>

This renders in the browser to:

<div id="menucontainer"> 
    <ul id="menu">              
        <li><a href="/">Home</a></li> 
        <li><a href="/Home/About">About Us</a></li> 
    </ul> 
</div>

I want to be able to dynamically set the active list item, based on the view that is being called. That is, when the user is looking at the home page, I would want the following HTML to be created:

<div id="menucontainer"> 
    <ul id="menu">              
        <li class="active"><a href="/">Home</a></li> 
        <li><a href="/Home/About">About Us</a></li> 
    </ul> 
</div>

I would expect that the way to do this would be something like:

<div id="menucontainer">
    <ul id="menu">              
        <li <% if(actionName == "Index"){%> class="active"<%}%>><%= Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")%></li>
        <li <% if(actionName == "About"){%> class="active"<%}%>><%= Html.ActionLink("About Us", "About", "Home")%></li>
    </ul>
</div>

The key bit here is the <% if(actionName == "Index"){%> class="active"<%}%> line. I do not know how to determine what the current actionName is.

Any suggestions on how to do this? Or, if I'm on completely the wrong track, is there a better way to do this?

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13 Answers

I made myself a helper method to handle this type of thing. In the code behind of my master page (could be pushed of to an extension method ... probably a better approach), I put the following code.

protected string ActiveActionLinkHelper(string linkText, string actionName, string controlName, string activeClassName)
{
    if (ViewContext.RouteData.Values["action"].ToString() == actionName && 
            ViewContext.RouteData.Values["controller"].ToString() == controlName)
        return Html.ActionLink(linkText, actionName, controlName, new { Class = activeClassName });

    return Html.ActionLink(linkText, actionName, controlName);
}

Then, I just call it in my page like so:

<%= ActiveActionLinkHelper("Home", "Index", "Home", "selected")%>
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thank you, I will use your method... –  Mihai Popescu May 22 '12 at 21:46
    
the new { Class = "selected" } should be new { Class = activeClassName } ;P –  Michal Ciechan Aug 2 '13 at 22:18
    
Awesome. Was just looking for this myself. –  Stevus Jul 3 at 20:33
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Inside a view, you can get the current action name with:

ViewContext.RouteData.Values["action"].ToString()
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You can also try to detect which is the current selected tab from its controller name and view name, then add the class attribute.

public static string MenuActionLink(this HtmlHelper helper, string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName)
{
    var htmlAttributes = new RouteValueDictionary();

    if (helper.ViewContext.Controller.GetType().Name.Equals(controllerName + "Controller", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
    {
        htmlAttributes.Add("class", "current");
    }

    return helper.ActionLink(linkText, actionName, controllerName, new RouteValueDictionary(), htmlAttributes);
}
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3  
If you're getting an error on return helper.ActionLink, Add this to your using references: using System.Web.Mvc.Html; –  Mike Nov 17 '12 at 8:07
1  
it should return a MvcHtmlString and not a string –  BjarkeCK Nov 28 '12 at 14:06
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In MVC 3 Razor View Engine, you can do it as:

@{string ctrName = ViewContext.RouteData.Values["controller"].ToString();}

<div id="menucontainer">
  <ul id="menu"> 
    <li @if(ctrName == "Home"){<text> class="active"</text>}>@ Html.ActionLink("Home",  "Index", "Home")</li>
    <li @if(ctrName == "About"){<text> class="active"</text>}>@ Html.ActionLink("About Us", "About", "Home")</li>
  </ul>
</div>

My sample worked when I has two pages as: Home/About and its controller has same name Index, so I get controller Name for distinction insteed of action. If you want to get action, just replace with following:

@{string ctrName = ViewContext.RouteData.Values["action"].ToString();}
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thanks simple and effective! –  castors33 May 14 '13 at 19:00
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To contribute my own answer (tested in MVC4), I took a few best bits of the other answers, fixed a few issues, and added a helper to work with urls that aren't necessarily resolved via Controller & Action (eg. if you have an embedded CMS dealing with some page links, etc.)

The code is also forkable on github: https://gist.github.com/2851684

/// 
/// adds the active class if the link's action & controller matches current request
/// 
public static MvcHtmlString MenuActionLink(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper,
    string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName,
    object routeValues = null, object htmlAttributes = null,
    string activeClassName = "active")
{
    IDictionary htmlAttributesDictionary =
        HtmlHelper.AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes);

    if (((string)htmlHelper.ViewContext.RouteData.Values["controller"])
            .Equals(controllerName, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) &&
        ((string)htmlHelper.ViewContext.RouteData.Values["action"])
            .Equals(actionName, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
    {
        // careful in case class already exists
        htmlAttributesDictionary["class"] += " " + activeClassName;
    }

    return htmlHelper.ActionLink(linkText, actionName, controllerName,
                                    new RouteValueDictionary(routeValues),
                                    htmlAttributesDictionary);
}

/// 
/// adds the active class if the link's path matches current request
/// 
public static MvcHtmlString MenuActionLink(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper,
    string linkText, string path, object htmlAttributes = null,
    string activeClassName = "active")
{
    IDictionary htmlAttributesDictionary =
        HtmlHelper.AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes);
    if (HttpContext.Current.Request.Path
        .Equals(path, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
    {
        // careful in case class already exists
        htmlAttributesDictionary["class"] += " " + activeClassName;
    }
    var tagBuilder = new TagBuilder("a")
                            {
                                InnerHtml = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(linkText)
                                                ? HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(linkText)
                                                : string.Empty
                            };
    tagBuilder.MergeAttributes(htmlAttributesDictionary);
    tagBuilder.MergeAttribute("href", path);
    return MvcHtmlString.Create(tagBuilder.ToString(TagRenderMode.Normal));
}
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This should work using jQuery on the client side of things, uses Google to serve the latest jQuery library:

<script src="http://www.google.com/jsapi" type="text/javascript" language="javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">google.load("jquery", "1");</script>  

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
      $(document).ready(function(){
          var str=location.href.toLowerCase(); 
        $('#menucontainer ul#menu li a').each(function() {
                if (str.indexOf(this.href.toLowerCase()) > -1) {
                        $(this).attr("class","current"); //hightlight parent tab
                     }  
                });
      });  
    </script>
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5  
Please don't do this. –  Brady Jul 21 '11 at 20:43
    
@Brady why not? Looks like solid a solution. –  Edward Olamisan Jun 19 at 14:26
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Using MVC3 with a Razor View offers another option:

_Layout.cshtml:

<li class="@ViewBag.NavClassHome">@Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")</li>
<li class="@ViewBag.NavClassAbout">@Html.ActionLink("Disclaimer", "About", "Home")</li>

HomeController:

public ActionResult Index() {
    ViewBag.NavClassHome = "active";
    return View();
} 

public ActionResult About() {
    ViewBag.NavClassAbout = "active";
    return View();
}

If you want to preserve this for a postback as well, you have to assign the ViewBag value here as well:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index() {
    ViewBag.NavClassHome = "active";
    return View();
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult About() {
    ViewBag.NavClassAbout = "active";
    return View();
}

Tested and working fine for me, but you will have a css class name in your server side code.

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The fact that your View has to know about your controller's actions is breaking with the MVC pattern. Perhaps your controller could pass some "control" information to the view to ultimately allow it to accomplish the same thing, the only difference is who is in charge.

Like in your controller's action you could:

public ActionResult Index(){
     ViewData["currentAction"] = "Index";
     //... other code
    return View();
}

Then over in your view you could:

<% if( ((string)ViewData["currentAction"]) == "Index" {%> <!- some links --><% } %>
<% if( ((string)ViewData["currentAction"]) == "SomethingElse" {%> <!- some links --><% } %>

However, the more I think about it the more I question why you are using the same View for multiple actions. Is the view that similar?

If the use case justifies it then go with my above suggestion. But otherwise perhaps you could break things out into multiple views (one for each controller action) and the problem solves itself.

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Based on the previous answers, here is what my current solution is for the same issue:

In the master page I give each li an id that corresponds to the controller and the action, since this should be known from the ActionLink. I was previously doing this with the page title but this helps with organization.

Site.Master:

<ul id="menu">
    <li id="menuHomeIndex" runat="server"><%= Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home") %></li>
    <li id="menuHomeAbout" runat="server"><%= Html.ActionLink("About Us", "About", "Home") %></li>
</ul>

Site.Master.cs:

// This is called in Page_Load
private void SetActiveLink()
{
    string action = "" + ViewContext.RouteData.Values["controller"] + ViewContext.RouteData.Values["action"];
    var activeMenu = (HtmlGenericControl)Page.Master.FindControl("menu" + action);

    if (activeMenu != null)
    {
        activeMenu.Attributes.Add("class", "selected");
    }
}

It's more work than the inline code but I think it's cleaner and also lets you have actions with the same name in different controllers. So if you add more menu items with different controllers, not all actions named Index will be highlighted in the menu.

If anyone sees issues with this approach please let me know.

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Using MVC3 with a Razor View, you can implement this like:

<ul id="menu">
 @if (ViewContext.RouteData.Values["action"].ToString() == "Index")
 {
 <li class="active">@Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")</li>
 }
 else
 {
 <li>@Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")</li>
 }
 @if (ViewContext.RouteData.Values["action"].ToString() == "About")
 {
 <li class="active">@Html.ActionLink("About", "About", "Home")</li>
 }
 else
 {
 <li>@Html.ActionLink("About", "About", "Home")</li>
 }
</ul>

And then applying your style of your ".active" class like:

ul#menu li.active 
{
 text-decoration:underline;
}
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I wanted to have a bit more control over my layout, and this is what I did.

Create a LayoutModel that other models inherit:

public abstract class LayoutModel
{
    public CurrentPage CurrentPage { get; set; }
}

Create a LayoutAttribute that inherits from ActionFilterAttribute like so:

public class LayoutAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private CurrentPage _currentPage { get; set; }

    public LayoutAttribute(
        CurrentPage CurrentPage
    ){
        _currentPage = CurrentPage;
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        var result = filterContext.Result as ViewResultBase;
        if (result == null || result.Model == null || !(result.Model is LayoutModel)) return;

        ((LayoutModel)result.Model).CurrentPage = _currentPage;
    }
}

Now on the Action or Controller level I can set the current page (and other stuff if I wanted) like this:

[Layout(CurrentPage.Account)]
public class MyController : Controller
{

}

In my layout view I now have access to the current page, and whatever else I add to the LayoutModel.

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Try

<% if(ViewContext.ViewName == "Index"){%>

Should work fine !!!

EDIT : REMOVED IN BETA1

Removed the ViewName property from the ViewContext class.

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Here is the version compatible with the current version of MVC4.
I have rewritten Adam Carr's code as an extension method.

using System;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using System.Web.Mvc.Html;
using System.Web.Routing;

namespace MyApp.Web {
    public static class HtmlHelpers {
        /// <summary>
        /// Returns an anchor element (a element) that contains the virtual path of the
        /// specified action. If the controller name matches the active controller, the
        /// css class 'current' will be applied.
        /// </summary>
        public static MvcHtmlString MenuActionLink(this HtmlHelper helper, string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName) {
            var htmlAttributes = new RouteValueDictionary();
            string name = helper.ViewContext.Controller.GetType().Name;

            if (name.Equals(controllerName + "Controller", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
                htmlAttributes.Add("class", "current");

            return helper.ActionLink(linkText, actionName, controllerName, new RouteValueDictionary(), htmlAttributes);
        }
    }
}
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1  
helper.ActionLink doesn't compile –  Andy Brudtkuhl Nov 14 '12 at 4:55
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