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my code is pasted below.

I'm trying to use dup2 to redirect my output to file.

if I use it to redirect it works fine (if I remove the comments), output in file and not on stdout. ex: ls > test , results in ls outputting to test.

the problem is that ls, without the > doesn't output anything. If I leave the comments ls outputs just as it should, albeit with no ability to redirect.

redirect[0] is either < or > or nothing redirect[1] is the path for the file to redirect to

command is is an array of cstrings with the pices of the command commands is as well

example output with code commented

xxxxx@myshell:/home/majors/kingacev/ubuntumap/cop4610/proj1> ls
a.out  myshell.c  myshell.c~
xxxxx@myshell:/home/majors/kingacev/ubuntumap/cop4610/proj1>

with code uncommented

xxxxx@myshell:/home/majors/kingacev/ubuntumap/cop4610/proj1> ls
xxxxx@myshell:/home/majors/kingacev/ubuntumap/cop4610/proj1>


  /*
  if (!strcmp(redirect[0],">")){
    if ((fd = open(redirect[1], O_RDWR | O_CREAT)) != -1)
      dup2(fd, STDOUT_FILENO);
    close(fd);
  }
  */

  if (command[0][0] == '/'){
    int c = execv(command[0], commands);
    if (c != 0){
      printf("ERROR: command does not exist at path specified\n");
      exit(0);
    }
  }
  else if (!execv(path, commands)){
    exit(0);
  }
share|improve this question
    
What is redirect and how is it declared? – Joachim Pileborg Jan 30 '14 at 14:00
    
char* redirect[2]; [0] has either > or < or notheing and [1] has the path for the file – d0m1n1c Jan 30 '14 at 14:01
    
Oh, and have you tried stepping through the code with a debugger? – Joachim Pileborg Jan 30 '14 at 14:01
    
You don't need to test what any of the exec*() functions returns. If it succeeds, it doesn't return; if it returns, it failed. It is conventional to return a non-zero exit when something fails. You could simply call execvp(); it knows how to handle absolute (and relative) paths as well as simple names. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '14 at 14:04
    
yeah, all i could learn from stepping through was that it prints to stdout when the commented block is commented and it prints to nowhere when it's uncomented, unless redirect[0] is a > then it prints to file. – d0m1n1c Jan 30 '14 at 14:06

This code works, redirecting to file.out:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main(void)
{
    int fd;
    char *redirect[] = { ">", "file.out" };
    char *command[] = { "/bin/ls", "-l", 0 };

    if (!strcmp(redirect[0], ">"))
    {
        if ((fd = open(redirect[1], O_WRONLY | O_CREAT, 0644)) != -1)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "Dupping stdout to %s\n", redirect[1]);
            dup2(fd, STDOUT_FILENO);
            close(fd);
        }
    }

    if (command[0][0] == '/')
    {
        execv(command[0], command);
        fprintf(stderr, "ERROR: command %s does not exist at path specified\n", command[0]);
        return(1);
    }
    else
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "ERROR: not handling relative names like %s\n", command[0]);
        return(1);
    }
    return 0;
}

This code works too, not redirecting to file:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main(void)
{
    int fd;
    char *redirect[] = { "<", "file.in" };
    char *command[] = { "/bin/ls", "-l", 0 };

    if (!strcmp(redirect[0], ">"))
    {
        if ((fd = open(redirect[1], O_WRONLY | O_CREAT, 0644)) != -1)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "Dupping stdout to %s\n", redirect[1]);
            dup2(fd, STDOUT_FILENO);
            close(fd);
        }
    }

    if (command[0][0] == '/')
    {
        execv(command[0], command);
        fprintf(stderr, "ERROR: command %s does not exist at path specified\n", command[0]);
        return(1);
    }
    else
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "ERROR: not handling relative names like %s\n", command[0]);
        return(1);
    }
    return 0;
}

Note that it sets up the command array and uses execv(command[0], command); — this is the recommended way of doing business. Your code appears to have a variable commands with presumably the arguments to the program; you also appear to have a variable path with presumably the path name of the program. Since we can't see what's in those, it is hard to know what they contain and where there might be problems. Note the explicit null pointer (0) at the end of the command array. That is crucial. Note too that the error messages identify what was failing. There are few things more frustrating than a program that says "it went wrong" without identifying what 'it' is.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, what is the 0644 in open()? – d0m1n1c Jan 30 '14 at 14:36
    
The permissions on the file that is created. When you use open() with O_CREAT, it is a function that takes 3 arguments; otherwise, it takes just 2 arguments. The third argument is the permissions to set on the file, which will be modified by the umask setting. The mode 0644 is read/write for owner, read-only for group and others. There are ways to write that symbolically (S_IRUSR|S_IWUSR|S_IRGRP|S_IROTH) but frankly that takes me longer to comprehend than 0644 does — by a large margin. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '14 at 14:39
    
If you don't mind, could I send you a copy of my entire solution, I'd post it here, but I don't think my instructor would appreciate that. I still can't figure out why it's behaving as it is. – d0m1n1c Jan 30 '14 at 14:45

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