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Currently, I have a C++11 project that defines this enum class:

enum class ColorDef : color
{
    /// Transparent color
    TRANSPARENT    = 0xF000u,
    /// Black color
    BLACK          = 0x0000u,
    /// Red color
    RED            = 0x0E00u,
    /// Green color
    GREEN          = 0x00E0u,
    /// Blue color
    BLUE           = 0x000Eu,
    /// Yellow color
    YELLOW         = 0x0EE0u,
    /// Cyan color
    CYAN           = 0x00EEu,
    /// Magenta color
    MAGENTA        = 0x0E0Eu,
    /// Grey 10% color
    GREY10         = 0x0CCCu,
    /// Grey 25% color
    GREY25         = 0x0AAAu,
    /// Grey 50% color
    GREY50         = 0x0888u,
    /// Grey 75% color
    GREY75         = 0x0666u,
    /// Grey 80% color
    GREY80         = 0x0444u,
    /// Grey 90% color
    GREY90         = 0x0222u,
    /// White color
    WHITE          = 0x0EEEu,
    /// Cornflower Blue color
    CORNFLOWERBLUE = 0x068Eu
};

It compiles normally on Linux, on Code::Blocks 13.12, with GCC 4.8.1. Then, I cloned the SAME code on Windows, with the same IDE and same compiler, and it just doesn't recognize my enum class! It is an SDL application. I checked if it could be a library problem, but everything seems ok. Code::Blocks gives me the following errors for the line in which I define "TRANSPARENT":

error: expected identifier before numeric constant
error: expected '}' before numeric constant
error: expected unqualified-id before numeric constant

I also checked if it could've been already defined in my project, but it simply isn't. Please, help! I can't find a solution anywhere.

share|improve this question
    
What compiler options? –  John Zwinck Jan 30 at 14:23
    
-g and --std=c++11 –  Lucas Vieira Jan 30 at 14:26
    
Does a system header on Windows #define TRANSPARENT to something? –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 at 14:51
1  
Damn, I didn't think of this. Seems like Windows actually DOES define TRANSPARENT somewhere. Changed it to TRANSP and it all compiled ok. Thank you! –  Lucas Vieira Jan 30 at 14:56
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