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I have minute resolution stock data in this format

19980102 930 3.29473 3.30923 3.29473 3.29473 76119.2 4 0 0

Where the columns are 'Date', 'Time', 'Open', 'High', 'Low', 'Close', 'Volume', 'Split Factor', 'Earnings', 'Dividends'

(lines are terminated with 0x0A (Linefeed) not CR LF. It looks like pandas.read_csv copes with reading this data reasonably well.)

The data comes from a company called www.QuantQuote.com

I'm quite new to Pandas and python but I've read "Python for Data Analysis" by Wes McKinney. This is my first python project but I've written C, C++, C#, assembler etc code for many years.

My objective has been to create a DataFrame for each stock with the Date and Time combined into a TimeSeries "DateTime" index. I then intend to resample this to Daily and Monthly DataFrames.

I've tried various ways to get pandas.read_csv to read this in one step but I cant find a way to get it to read the 'Time' column. Its in a strange

930, 931, 932...17:28, 17:29, 17:30

format

Is there a better way to do this ? I was hoping to read the data in with a single call to _read_csv if possible

Here is what I have so far.

from pandas import Series, DataFrame
import pandas as pd

import os

mypath = "c:\PythonStuff\QuantQuoteData\table_aapl.txt"
columnHeadings = ['Date', 'Time', 'Open', 'High', 'Low', 'Close', 'Volume', 'Split Factor', 'Earnings', 'Dividends']

minData = pd.read_csv(mypath, names=columnHeadings, dtype= {"Date":str, "Time":str}, parse_dates = False, sep=' ')

minData["Time"] = minData["Time"].map(lambda x : x[:-2] + ":" + x[-2:] + ":00+00:00")
minData["DateTimeStr"] = minData["Date"] + " " + minData["Time"]
minData["DateTime"] = pd.to_datetime(minData["DateTimeStr"])

minData.index = minData["DateTime"]

Here are the first few lines of the "table_aapl.txt" file

19980102 930 3.29473 3.30923 3.29473 3.29473 76119.2 4 0 0 19980102 931 3.29473 3.29473 3.2778 3.29473 263522 4 0 0 19980102 932 3.29473 3.29473 3.2778 3.29473 120384 4 0 0 19980102 933 3.29473 3.29473 3.2633 3.2633 82738.3 4 0 0 19980102 934 3.2633 3.29473 3.2633 3.2778 11169.6 4 0 0 19980102 935 3.29473 3.29473 3.2778 3.2778 11997 4 0 0 19980102 936 3.2633 3.29473 3.2633 3.2778 109628 4 0 0

Any help is greatly appreciated


EDIT: Finally, Here is the best solution I could come up with. Everything is obvious in retrospect :)

Thanks for the help :)

columnHeadings = ['Date', 'Time', 'Open', 'High', 'Low', 'Close', 'Volume', 'Split Factor', 'Earnings', 'Dividends']

minData = pd.read_csv(
    myFile,
    header = None,
    names = columnHeadings, 
    parse_dates = [["Date", "Time"]],
    date_parser = lambda x: datetime.datetime.strptime(x, '%Y%m%d %H%M'), 
    index_col = "Date_Time",
    sep=' ')
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I had a problem using your code but the following worked for me and should work for you with some minor tweaks, the important step here is using strptime to create the datetime from string:

import the data:

minData = pd.read_csv(r'c:\data.txt', parse_dates = [[0,1]], header=None,sep=' ')
minData
Out[17]:
            0_1        2        3        4        5         6  7  8  9  10
0  19980102 930  3.29473  3.30923  3.29473  3.29473   76119.2  4  0  0 NaN
1  19980102 931  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  263522.0  4  0  0 NaN
2  19980102 932  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  120384.0  4  0  0 NaN
3  19980102 933  3.29473  3.29473  3.26330  3.26330   82738.3  4  0  0 NaN
4  19980102 934  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780   11169.6  4  0  0 NaN
5  19980102 935  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.27780   11997.0  4  0  0 NaN
6  19980102 936  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780  109628.0  4  0  0 NaN

[7 rows x 10 columns]

#now convert the string using datetime.datetime.strptime:
# rename the first column (may not be necessary for you)
In [20]:

minData.rename(columns={'0_1':columnHeadings[0], 1:columnHeadings[1]},inplace=True)
minData
Out[20]:
           Date        2        3        4        5         6  7  8  9  10
0  19980102 930  3.29473  3.30923  3.29473  3.29473   76119.2  4  0  0 NaN
1  19980102 931  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  263522.0  4  0  0 NaN
2  19980102 932  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  120384.0  4  0  0 NaN
3  19980102 933  3.29473  3.29473  3.26330  3.26330   82738.3  4  0  0 NaN
4  19980102 934  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780   11169.6  4  0  0 NaN
5  19980102 935  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.27780   11997.0  4  0  0 NaN
6  19980102 936  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780  109628.0  4  0  0 NaN

[7 rows x 10 columns]
# now use strptime to format the string into a datetime object
In [21]:

import datetime
minData['Date'] = minData['Date'].apply(lambda x: datetime.datetime.strptime(x, '%Y%m%d %H%M'))
minData
Out[21]:
                 Date        2        3        4        5         6  7  8  9  \
0 1998-01-02 09:30:00  3.29473  3.30923  3.29473  3.29473   76119.2  4  0  0   
1 1998-01-02 09:31:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  263522.0  4  0  0   
2 1998-01-02 09:32:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  120384.0  4  0  0   
3 1998-01-02 09:33:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.26330  3.26330   82738.3  4  0  0   
4 1998-01-02 09:34:00  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780   11169.6  4  0  0   
5 1998-01-02 09:35:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.27780   11997.0  4  0  0   
6 1998-01-02 09:36:00  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780  109628.0  4  0  0   

   10  
0 NaN  
1 NaN  
2 NaN  
3 NaN  
4 NaN  
5 NaN  
6 NaN  

[7 rows x 10 columns]
#confirm that we have converted the dates:
In [22]:

minData.dtypes
Out[22]:
Date    datetime64[ns]
2              float64
3              float64
4              float64
5              float64
6              float64
7                int64
8                int64
9                int64
10             float64
dtype: object

You can then set the index:

In [24]:

minData.set_index('Date')
Out[24]:
                          2        3        4        5         6   7   8   9   \
Date                                                                            
1998-01-02 09:30:00  3.29473  3.30923  3.29473  3.29473   76119.2   4   0   0   
1998-01-02 09:31:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  263522.0   4   0   0   
1998-01-02 09:32:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  120384.0   4   0   0   
1998-01-02 09:33:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.26330  3.26330   82738.3   4   0   0   
1998-01-02 09:34:00  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780   11169.6   4   0   0   
1998-01-02 09:35:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.27780   11997.0   4   0   0   
1998-01-02 09:36:00  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780  109628.0   4   0   0   

                     10  
Date                     
1998-01-02 09:30:00 NaN  
1998-01-02 09:31:00 NaN  
1998-01-02 09:32:00 NaN  
1998-01-02 09:33:00 NaN  
1998-01-02 09:34:00 NaN  
1998-01-02 09:35:00 NaN  
1998-01-02 09:36:00 NaN  

[7 rows x 9 columns]
share|improve this answer
    
Aha - I've just understood what you're doing here.. Much better than I had!! ((sorry I find this editor on stackoverflow is really awkward!) I'll try this method now. Really I'd prefer if the answer from user xndrme would work because it seems neater. –  JasonEdinburgh Jan 30 at 15:50
    
@JasonEdinburgh user @xndrme's answer probably will work fine, however, there are some cases where the parser will just fail and you have to define the format string yourself. In these situations you have to use strptime and this is what I almost always do because I have better control over the outcome, rather than try the dateutil parser and then see if it fails. You can define the lambda as a function and set this as the parser arg in read_csv like this: pd.read_csv(path, date_parser=my_date_parser) will work as a notional example –  EdChum Jan 30 at 16:30
    
I finally got this to work! I put everything in its own new editor window and the problems I was having disappeared. Here's the output I get ... dowce.com/~ZqT My only confusion is whether this is actually indexed by the new Date column or not ? –  JasonEdinburgh Jan 30 at 16:38
    
(our comments crossed) just read your comment now –  JasonEdinburgh Jan 30 at 16:39
1  
@JasonEdinburgh no it is not using this as an index, to do that do this: minData.set_index('Date'), you can confirm by doing this minData.index it will output the values –  EdChum Jan 30 at 16:40
show 2 more comments

Try this:

 import pandas as pd
import dateutil.parser as parser

def f(d):
    if len(d)==12:
        d = d[:9]+"0"+d[9:]
    return parser.parse(d)

columnHeadings = ['Date', 'Time', 'Open', 'High', 'Low', 'Close', 'Volume', 'Split Factor', 'Earnings', 'Dividends']
minData = pd.read_csv("table_aapl.txt", names=columnHeadings, sep=' ', parse_dates=[[0,1]], index_col=0, date_parser=f)

print minData

Output:

                        Open     High      Low    Close    Volume  \
Date_Time                                                           
1998-01-02 09:30:00  3.29473  3.30923  3.29473  3.29473   76119.2   
1998-01-02 09:31:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  263522.0   
1998-01-02 09:32:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  120384.0   
1998-01-02 09:33:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.26330  3.26330   82738.3   
1998-01-02 09:34:00  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780   11169.6   
1998-01-02 09:35:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.27780   11997.0   
1998-01-02 09:36:00  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780  109628.0   

                     Split Factor  Earnings  Dividends  
Date_Time                                               
1998-01-02 09:30:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:31:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:32:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:33:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:34:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:35:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:36:00             4         0          0  

[7 rows x 8 columns]

Well, I've just tried with a two arguments function and it receives two arrays of values so I've managed to do this:

def g(d,t):
    res = []
    for dd,tt in zip(d,t):                
        date_time = dd
        if len(tt)==3:
            date_time += " 0"
        else:
            date_time += " "
        date_time += tt
        res.append(parser.parse(date_time))
    return pd.DatetimeIndex(res)

Now just call pd.read_csv as pd.read_csv("table_aapl.txt", names=columnHeadings, sep=' ', parse_dates=[[0,1]], index_col=0, date_parser=g)

Output:

                        Open     High      Low    Close    Volume  \
Date_Time                                                           
1998-01-02 09:30:00  3.29473  3.30923  3.29473  3.29473   76119.2   
1998-01-02 09:31:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  263522.0   
1998-01-02 09:32:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.29473  120384.0   
1998-01-02 09:33:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.26330  3.26330   82738.3   
1998-01-02 09:34:00  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780   11169.6   
1998-01-02 09:35:00  3.29473  3.29473  3.27780  3.27780   11997.0   
1998-01-02 09:36:00  3.26330  3.29473  3.26330  3.27780  109628.0   

                     Split Factor  Earnings  Dividends  
Date_Time                                               
1998-01-02 09:30:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:31:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:32:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:33:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:34:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:35:00             4         0          0  
1998-01-02 09:36:00             4         0          0  

[8 rows x 8 columns]
share|improve this answer
    
I think I see what you're trying to do.. cunning !I get an error I'll try to work out how to paste it here –  JasonEdinburgh Jan 30 at 15:42
    
I cant see how to post the entire stack trace here. This is the last part C:\Users\Jason\AppData\Local\Enthought\Canopy\User\lib\site-packages\pandas\io\d‌​ate_converters.pyc in generic_parser(parse_func, *cols) 35 for i in xrange(N): 36 args = [c[i] for c in cols] ---> 37 results[i] = parse_func(*args) 38 39 return results TypeError: f() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given) In [32]: –  JasonEdinburgh Jan 30 at 15:45
    
Could you try def f(d,e):\n print d,e\n ... #the rest the same? just to see what is being passed to f. I can't figure it out, I copy-paste the code from answer again to my shell and it runs fine :( –  xndrme Jan 30 at 15:52
    
hopefully you can see this dowce.com/~Zqh –  JasonEdinburgh Jan 30 at 15:58
1  
You are welcome, Well, reading dowce.com/~Zqt I see there are 8 data columns, so if Date is not the index what else it could be? Also try with ... parse_dates=[['Date','Time']], index_col='Date_Time',... to see if now it keeps the column names. I really don't know what's happening, for me all the alternatives are working fine, even with the one argument f :( –  xndrme Jan 30 at 16:57
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