Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

== Summary ==
I want to print something and printf somehow automatically adds a "\n" somewhere in the text. It seems to depend on the lenght of the output, as the position changed when I changed the text to post it here. But it doesn't add the new line at a specific letter, nor at a specific place (except if I don't change the text, then it stays at the same position).

Example-Output:

text "string" text "second_string
" text "XYZ".

== Related Code ==

The printf in question:

printf("\ntext \"%s\" text \"%s\" text \"XYZ\".", string, second_string);

There's a getchar() just before to wait for the enter key:

getchar();

This all is inside of an if-statement and just before this statement is:

fgets(second_string, 100, stdin);

The whole code ('>' marks the line in question):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <string.h>

char string[20] = "string\0";
char second_string[100];

void function2() {

  system("cls");
  printf("text");    

}

void function(void) {  

  function2();  

  printf("text");

  fgets(second_string, 100, stdin);

  if (strcmp("second string", second_string)==0) {
    function2();
  }
  else {

    function2();
    printf("text");
    getchar();

    function2();
>   printf("\ntext \"%s\" text \"%s\" text \"XYZ\".", string, second_string);

    fgets(second_string, 100, stdin);

  }

}

void main(void) {
  function();
}

== Some title ==
That's the core of my problem. Feel free to ask for details. I know that the solution's probably pretty easy, but I can't find it anywhere on the internet (probably I'm just bad in searching) and need it for school. If the solution was already posted somewhere before, feel free to provide a link so I can read through it. Also I'm swiss, so my english probably isn't the best :D

Thanks in advance!

And if someone wants to complain about this wall of maybe redundant information, I just want to give as many information as possible. There's a summary at the top. It holds the basic information.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by alk c Dec 25 '14 at 10:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
In case you weren't aware, fgets() retains the trailing newline from stdin as the last char in its resulting array. You may want to consider that. – WhozCraig Jan 30 '14 at 15:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The fgets function will copy the new line character into the string when it reads it in from the console. Hence second_string ends in a new line character, that is printed to the screen as a new line. You need to remove that from the string if you don't want it to appear

share|improve this answer

fgets retains the newline character, if there is one. You have an implicit \n in second_string. So, in the second double-quoted string, you will always see a newline before the closing quote.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.