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I have an interest in using node-suppose instead of expect. I use expect sometimes but i get frustrated trying to deal with different conditions. For example, I use an expect script to change my passwords on a group of servers before my passwords expire.

Some servers might prompt me to change my password automatically, some might require me to run the passwd command, some might disconnect the session remotely immediately following the password change, some don't.

The way I deal with this in expect is ugly and doesn't work correctly 100% of the time.

So basically I am trying to find a way to properly use 'if' statements with suppose

The readme page (https://github.com/jprichardson/node-suppose/blob/master/README.md) doesn't really show how I would do this and I can't find any other examples. Here is the example in the README.md on github.

var suppose = require('suppose')
  , fs = require('fs')
  , assert = require('assert')

process.chdir('/tmp/awesome');
fs.writeFileSync('/tmp/awesome/README.md', 'READ IT')
suppose('npm', ['init'])
  .debug(fs.createWriteStream('/tmp/debug.txt')) //optional writeable output stream
  .on(/name\: \([\w|\-]+\)[\s]*/).respond('awesome_package\n')
  .on('version: (0.0.0) ').respond('0.0.1\n')
  .on('description: ').respond("It's an awesome package man!\n")
  .on('entry point: (index.js) ').respond("\n")
  .on('test command: ').respond('npm test\n')
  .on('git repository: ').respond("\n")
  .on('keywords: ').respond('awesome, cool\n')
  .on('author: ').respond('JP Richardson\n')
  .on('license: (BSD) ').respond('MIT\n')
  .on('ok? (yes) ' ).respond('yes\n')
.error(function(err){
  console.log(err.message);
})
.end(function(code){
  var packageFile = '/tmp/awesome/package.json';
  fs.readFile(packageFile, function(err, data){
    var packageObj = JSON.parse(data.toString());
    console.log(packageObj.name); //'awesome_package'
  })
})

EDIT: I'm including an expect script I use. This only works on AIX servers. I tried to make a script that did both AIX and Linux servers but I got frustrated because I couldn't figure out how to handle when the server closes the connection. It would completely stop the script instead of moving on to the next server in the list. Apparently I was so frustrated I deleted it because I can't find it anymore.

But in this other script, you can see how I am trying to make case like scenarios but I end up having to repeat code over and over because I can't make functions, even a goto would make this easier. And I have to store passwords in environment variables. Like I said, its ugly. I would much rather spend time working on more modern stuff than TCL.

#!/usr/bin/expect -f
#

# set some variables
set timeout 5
set ::logfile [open ./AIX_password_update.log a]
set stamp [clock format [clock seconds] -format {%Y-%m-%d-%T}]


#start task
puts "\n\n\n"
puts "$stamp\nStarting!\nLog file AIX_password_update.log"
puts "\n\n"

#prepare host list for processing
set fd [open $env(HOSTLIST) r]
set hosts [read -nonewline $fd]
close $fd

foreach host [split $hosts "\n" ] {

#connect to host and start sending commands
    spawn /usr/bin/ssh $env(LOGINID)@$host

    set stamp [clock format [clock seconds] -format {%Y-%m-%d-%T}]
    puts "\n############################"
    puts "## Connecting to $host ##"
    puts "############################"

#deal with SSH client and log in if needed
    expect {
        "yes/no" {
            send "yes\r"
            expect {
                "password:" {
                    send "$env(PASSWDU)\r"
                    expect {
                        "ermission denied" {
                            puts "Permission Denied!!!\nmoving on to the next host in the list\n"
                            puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Permission denied, wrong password for $env(LOGINID)"
                            continue
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
#deal with SSH/DNS/Network problems and log in if needed
    expect {
        "ssh: Could not resolve hostname" {
        puts "Could not resolve hostname!!!\nmoving to the next host in the list\n"
        puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Could not resolve hostname"
        continue
        }
        timeout {
        puts "Request timed out!!!\nmoving to the next host in the list\n"
        puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Request timed out"
        continue
        }
        "password:" {
            send "$env(PASSWDU)\r"
                expect {
                    "ermission denied" {
                        puts "Permission Denied!!!\nmoving on to the next host in the list\n"
                        puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Permission denied, wrong password for $env(LOGINID)"
                        continue
                    }
                }
        }
        "\\$" {
        }

    }

#make sure this is an AIX server, skip if it is not
    send "uname\r"
    expect {
        "Linux" {
                        set uname Linux
        }
        "AIX" {
                        set uname AIX
        }
    }
    if { $uname != "AIX" } {
        puts "This server is not AIX!!!\nmoving on to the next host in the list"
        puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Not AIX"
        continue
    }
#su to root
    expect {
      "\\$" {
        send "su -\r"
        expect {
            "assword:" {
                send "$env(ROOTPW)\r"
                expect eof
                puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - su to root success"
            }
        }
      }
    }
#detect root prompt and change the password for the user
    expect {
        "#" {
            send "\r"
            send "passwd $env(USERID)\r"
            expect {
                "New password:" {
                    send "$env(PASSWDN)\r"
                    expect {
                        "Re-enter" {
                            send "$env(PASSWDN)\r"
                            expect eof
                            send "pwdadm -c $env(USERID)\r"
                            expect eof
                            puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Password changed for $env(USERID)"
                            puts "$stamp - $host - Password changed for $env(USERID)"
                        }
                        "again" {
                            send "$env(PASSWDN)\r"
                            expect eof
                            send "pwdadm -c $env(USERID)\r"
                            expect eof
                            puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Password changed for $env(USERID)"
                            puts "$stamp - $host - Password changed for $env(USERID)"
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        "root" {
            send "\r"
            send "passwd $env(USERID)\r"
            expect {
                "New password:" {
                    send "$env(PASSWDN)\r"
                    expect {
                        "Re-enter" {
                            send "$env(PASSWDN)\r"
                            expect eof
                            send "pwdadm -c $env(USERID)\r"
                            expect eof
                            puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Password changed for $env(USERID)"
                            puts "$stamp - $host - Password changed for $env(USERID)"
                        }
                        "again" {
                            send "$env(PASSWDN)\r"
                            expect eof
                            send "pwdadm -c $env(USERID)\r"
                            expect eof
                            puts $::logfile "$stamp - $host - Password changed for $env(USERID)"
                            puts "$stamp - $host - Password changed for $env(USERID)"
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
expect eof
}
expect eof
share|improve this question
    
If you're specifically NOT using expect for this... why the tag? –  James Jan 30 '14 at 17:40
    
I was thinking maybe it would make some Expect users aware of this node module. The more people who use it the more likely I am to get help with it. Also, was hoping maybe some old Expect guru would show up and angrily tell me how to do the same thing in Expect correctly. Should I remove the tag? –  xdaxdb Jan 30 '14 at 17:49
    
Well... the way I see it, if you would accept an expect solution then you can - and should - leave it. But then you should state so in your question. If you are not interested in a solution using expect, as I believe is currently implied by your wording, then I would remove it. –  James Jan 30 '14 at 18:10
    
Although I object to "old Expect guru" ;), I'd be willing to look at your expect script. –  glenn jackman Jan 30 '14 at 18:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Author of node-suppose here...

Unfortunately, node-suppose doesn't support conditions. My comparison to expect may have been a poor comparison since it doesn't support a lot of expect features. However, in the future it may support conditions. I did post an issue here in to reference this: https://github.com/jprichardson/node-suppose/issues/7

share|improve this answer

Here is a simplified script for the simple case where you log in as the LOGINID user and call "passwd" for the USERID user. From your script, I could not grok the situations where you would have to use "su -" or "pwdadm"

The use of exp_continue reduces much code repitition. exp_continue essentially loops within the expect command so that you can wait for another pattern to appear.

#!/user/bin/expect -f

set timeout 5
set fd [open $env(HOSTLIST) r]
while {[gets $fd host] != -1} {
    puts ""
    puts "################################################"
    puts "# CONNECTING TO $host #"
    puts "################################################"

    spawn /usr/bin/ssh $env(LOGINID)@$host

    expect {
        "yes/no" {
            send "yes\r"
            exp_continue
        }
        "assword:" {
            send "$env(PASSWDU)\r"
            exp_continue
        }
        "ssh: Could not resolve hostname" {
            puts "Could not resolve hostname!!!\nmoving to the next host in the list\n"
            continue
        }
        timeout {
            puts "Request timed out!!!\nmoving to the next host in the list\n"
            continue
        }
        -re {\$\s*$}
    }

    send "passwd $env(USERID)\r"

    expect {
        "Old password:" {
            send "$env(PASSWDU)\r"
            exp_continue
        }
        -re "New password:|again:|Re-enter" {
            send "$env(PASSWDTEMP)\r"
            exp_continue
        }
        -re {\$\s*$}
    }

    send "exit\r"
    expect eof
}
share|improve this answer
    
changing the password as root and then issuing pwdadm -c gets me around annoying password policies that might be inconsistent between servers. I actually just updated my question because I found the latest version of the script... basically just added logging. I assume -re is for Regex... wow I never thought of that. I just happened to be reading up on regex for MongoDB. –  xdaxdb Jan 30 '14 at 22:42
    
Do you think you could show me how to detect if the server closes the connection, and deal with it? Like on Redhat Linux, if your password is old enough it forces you to change it at login and then disconnects your ssh session after you change it to force you to log back in. I can't figure out how to accomidate that... because it doesn't happen all the time maybe a few times out of say 50 servers. –  xdaxdb Jan 30 '14 at 22:50
    
Oh and how do you feel about storing passwords in environment variables? can you think of a better way? –  xdaxdb Jan 30 '14 at 22:52
    
could you expand on -re {\$\s*$} a bit? I'm reading http://perldoc.perl.org/perlrequick.html trying to make sense of it. –  xdaxdb Feb 6 '14 at 17:43
    
That is a regular expression to match the prompt for your ssh session: a literal $, optional whitespace, end-of-string. Note that expect is a Tcl extension, so this and this would be better resources. –  glenn jackman Feb 6 '14 at 17:46

If you're already using node.js, you should look into using ssh2 instead of using an expect-like script for connecting to an ssh server.

EDIT: Also, you should consider using public key authentication instead of passwords, whether that's using a key directly or through an agent like ssh-agent.

share|improve this answer
    
I do use ssh keys. Unfortunately security policy requires us to update our passwords every few months. On many servers, when your password expires your ssh key/passphrase no longer works so I have to use this script every so often to update my passwords. –  xdaxdb Feb 6 '14 at 18:31

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