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I know that one should be careful when initializing a locally declared variable(reference).

! THIS IS THE WRONG WAY (A local variable that is initialized when declared has an implicit save attribute.)

     real function kinetic_energy(v)
     real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: v
     real :: ke = 0.0
     end function kinetic_energy

! THIS IS THE RIGHT WAY

     real function kinetic_energy(v)
     real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: v
     real :: ke
     ke = 0.
     end function kinetic_energy

I am wondering whether we have something like this for pointers as well or not.

     real function kinetic_energy(v)
     real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: v
     real, pointer :: ke => null()
     end function kinetic_energy

or

     real function kinetic_energy(v)
     real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: v
     real, pointer :: ke
     nullify(ke)
     end function kinetic_energy

A pointer variable that is nullified when declared would be considered as a save attribute!

Thanks for the helpful information. I have read that always initialize pointers to NULL, based on what you said this could be totally wrong statement. For example, I should not initialize my local pointer variables inside my subroutines! (if they are allocated to the new size at each entry to the subroutine) Am I right!!!

 real function kinetic_energy(v)   
 real, dimension(:), intent(in) :: v   
 !local variables
 real, dimension(:), pointer :: ke => null()
 integer :: n
 !
 n=size(v,1)   
 allocate(ke(n))   
 !make a copy   
 ke=v   
 !do some computation ...   
 end function kinetic_energy
share|improve this question

The situation for pointer and nonpointers is really almost the same. @francescalus is right that the rule 5.3.16.1 indeed talks about the possibility of the pointer target becoming undefined, but it is not important here. Of course if the saved pointer pointed to something short-lived, it will not be valid after the target ceased to exist, but that is quite obvious.

But the semantics of the explicit initialization is the same for pointers and non-pointers. It implies the save attribute. That means that the value or pointer association is retained between procedure invocations and therefore that the initialization is done only once (your versions 1 and 3). If you want to assign the desired value at every procedure invocation, you must use normal executable assignment, not explicit initialization expression or other executable statements (your versions 2 and 4).


Edit:

Regarding your new (last) example, this looks like a place to use allocatable instead of pointer to me. They are never undefined but start as not allocated.

If you need it to be a pointer it still doesn't have to be nullified before allocation necessarily if you do not test its association status. You can always use nullify() at the beginning of the executable code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this information. But it would be really great if you can help me again. I have read that always initialize pointers to NULL, based on what you said this could be totally wrong statement. Fro example, I should not initialize my local pointer variables inside my subroutines! (if they are allocated to the new size at each entry to the subroutine) – ziv Jan 31 '14 at 7:59
    
That statement means that you should use the nullify statement or p => null() at the beginning of the subroutine, nothing more. Also, not everything you read somewhere is necessarily true. Of course, if you allocate the pointers immediately, you do not have to nullify them before. – Vladimir F Jan 31 '14 at 8:26
1  
@user3244667 It may also be that the advice was about always default initializing a pointer component. This is much better advice than initialization in a subprogram (where there are many counterexamples). – francescalus Jan 31 '14 at 8:52
1  
That's right. Or do that in the executable pointer assignment statement. Almost certainly not in the declaration. – Vladimir F Jan 31 '14 at 11:23
2  
Also consider using allocatables instead of pointers whenever possible. They are always automatically initialized as not allocated. – Vladimir F Jan 31 '14 at 11:26

The section (5.2.3) of the F2008 standard referring to the implicit SAVE attribute does not distinguish between the cases of POINTER or not-POINTER.

As an aside, while a pointer will acquire the attribute, for pointers SAVE means something slightly different:

[...] unless it is a pointer and its target becomes undefined

See @VladimirF's answer (which prompted me to clarify here) for more. Note, though, that mistakenly thinking a pointer null-initialized is nullified on each entry to a scope is perhaps worse than thinking a variable is assigned zero each time: simply testing ASSOCIATED(ke) is non-standard if ke has undefined pointer association status.

Going to your examples, you have the "WRONG WAY" and "RIGHT WAY" the wrong way around: the "WRONG WAY" is the right way to initialize, and the "RIGHT WAY" is the wrong way to initialize. That is, only in the first case is any initialization happening.

Edit, following the question update:

Variables with the pointer attribute are not different from variables without when it comes to initialization: if a variable has explicit initialization it acquires the save attribute. If you want a variable to not have this attribute, then it can't be explicitly initialized. [This is a more explicit answer to the original question than I may have had before.]

There is advice out there about always "initializing" pointers. In the words of MR&C who generally have good advice:

Our recommendation is that all pointers be so initialized to reduce the risk of bizarre effects from the accidental use of undefined pointers. This is an aid too in writing code that avoids memory leaks.

The "initialized" here, though, does include "nullified early in the subroutine" as well as explicit initialization.

However, it isn't a requirement. If a pointer is to be associated with something else it needn't be (but could be) nullified first. And even good advice isn't an excuse to avoid being careful.

But it still holds, that if save is not good, then explicit initialization is not good.

Also, it's possible that you saw advice about it being good for pointer components of a derived type having default initialization. This is sane advice.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, my mistake. I have corrected the code in my question and now it is an initialization matter like above. – ziv Jan 30 '14 at 20:17
    
I thought that was what you meant - indeed I didn't initially notice the issue - and I've removed that part of the answer. – francescalus Jan 30 '14 at 21:15

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