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I have several asynchronous network operations that return a task that may never finish:

  1. UdpClient.ReceiveAsync doesn't accept a CancellationToken
  2. TcpClient.GetStream returns a NetworkStream that doesn't respect the CancellationToken on Stream.ReadAsync (checking for cancellation only at the start of the operation)

Both wait for a message that may never come (because of packet loss or no response for example). That means I have phantom tasks that never complete, continuations that will never run and used sockets on hold. I know i can use TimeoutAfter, but that will only fix the continuation problem.

So what am I supposed to do?

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At least, TcpClient will throw an exception (or return 0 in stream.Read) eventually. so there won't be any phantom tasks. Assuming you create only one UdpClient in your application one phantom task isn't a problem. If you think i am wrong please post a real case(+code) so that we can make concrete answers. –  L.B Jan 30 at 22:45
    
@L.B It won't in stream.ReadAsync (added to the question). And i use both tcp and udp concurrently hundreds of times a second. –  I3arnon Jan 30 at 22:51
    
Sorry but I have written millions of codes using TcpClient or UdpClient but i never needed a method like this (of course in services running 24/7). BTW: packet loss doesn't apply to TCP –  L.B Jan 30 at 22:53
    
I assure you i didn't invent my situation. I ran out of udp ports while performance testing. –  I3arnon Jan 30 at 23:00
1  
@L.B, packet loss does apply to TCP, but it's handled transparently to the application layer. –  Nathan Ernst Jan 31 at 2:16

2 Answers 2

So what am I supposed to do?

In this particular case, I would rather use UdpClient.Client.ReceiveTimeout and TcpClient.ReceiveTimeout to time out a UDP or TCP receive operation gracefully. I'd like to have the time-out error coming from the socket, rather than from any external source.

If in addition to that I need to observe some other cancellation event, like a UI button click, I would just use WithCancellation from Stephen Toub's "How do I cancel non-cancelable async operations?", like this:

using (var client = new UdpClient())
{
    UdpClient.Client.ReceiveTimeout = 2000;

    var result = await client.ReceiveAsync().WithCancellation(userToken);
    // ...
}

To address the comment, in case ReceiveTimeout has no effect on ReceiveAsync, I'd still use WithCancellation:

using (var client = new UdpClient())
using (var cts = CancellationTokenSource.CreateLinkedTokenSource(userToken))
{
    UdpClient.Client.ReceiveTimeout = 2000;
    cts.CancelAfter(2000);

    var result = await client.ReceiveAsync().WithCancellation(cts.Token);
    // ...
}

IMO, this more clearly shows my intentions as a developer and is more readable to a 3rd party. Also, I don't need to catch ObjectDisposedException exeception. I still need to observe OperationCanceledException somewhere in my client code which calls this, but I'd be doing that anyway. OperationCanceledException usually stands out from other exceptions, and I have an option to check OperationCanceledException.CancellationToken to observe the reason for cancellation.

Other than that, there's not much difference from @I3arnon's answer. I just don't feel like I need another pattern for this, as I already have WithCancellation at my disposal.

To further address the comments:

  • I'd only be catching OperationCanceledException in the client code, i.e.:

async void Button_Click(sender o, EventArgs args)
{
    try
    {
        await DoSocketStuffAsync(_userCancellationToken.Token);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        while (ex is AggregateException)
            ex = ex.InnerException;
        if (ex is OperationCanceledException)
            return; // ignore if cancelled
        // report otherwise
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
    }
} 
  • Yes, I'll be using WithCancellation with each ReadAsync call and I like that fact, for the following reasons. Firstly, I can create an extension ReceiveAsyncWithToken:

public static class UdpClientExt
{
    public static Task<UdpReceiveResult> ReceiveAsyncWithToken(
        this UdpClient client, CancellationToken token)
    {
        return client.ReceiveAsync().WithCancellation(token);
    }
}

Secondly, in 3yrs from now I may be reviewing this code for .NET 6.0. By then, Microsoft may have a new API, UdpClient.ReceiveAsyncWithTimeout. In my case, I'll simply replace ReceiveAsyncWithToken(token) or ReceiveAsync().WithCancellation(token) with ReceiveAsyncWithTimeout(timeout, userToken). It would not be so obvious to deal with CreateTimeoutScope.

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Timeouts are only relevant to synchronous operations, not async ones: "This option applies to synchronous Receive calls only. If the time-out period is exceeded, the Receive method will throw a SocketException." from msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  I3arnon Jan 31 at 0:13
    
@l3arnon, I updated the answer to address your comment. –  Noseratio Jan 31 at 0:21
    
WithCancellation though won't really cancel the ReceiveAsync phantom task, it only allows to "abandon" it, just like TimeoutAfter (also by toub) –  I3arnon Jan 31 at 0:25
1  
@l3arnon, it will cancel in it the same way your DisposableScope will: client.Dispose will be called as soon as the corresponding using scope ends. Which will end as soon as WithCancellation throws a TaskCancelledException. This way, I don't have to observe ObjectDisposedException as you do. –  Noseratio Jan 31 at 0:28
3  
I laughed at the ".NET 6.0" part. Well said. One should hope that by then Microsoft don't bring back the old UnobservedTaskException behaviour, because then a lot of people using WithCancellation (and not handling the exceptions thrown inside the abandoned task, i.e. ObjectDisposedException in this case) will be kicking themselves. –  Kirill Shlenskiy Jan 31 at 1:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

So i've made an extension method on IDisposable that creates a CancellationToken that disposes the connection on timeout, so the task finishes and everything carries on:

public static IDisposable CreateTimeoutScope(this IDisposable disposable, TimeSpan timeSpan)
{
    var cancellationTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource(timeSpan);
    var cancellationTokenRegistration = cancellationTokenSource.Token.Register(disposable.Dispose);
    return new DisposableScope(
        () =>
        {
            cancellationTokenRegistration.Dispose();
            cancellationTokenSource.Dispose();
            disposable.Dispose();
        });
}

And the usage is extremely simple:

try
{
    var client = new UdpClient();
    using (client.CreateTimeoutScope(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2)))
    {
        var result = await client.ReceiveAsync();
        // Handle result
    }
}
catch (ObjectDisposedException)
{
    return null;
}

Extra Info:

public sealed class DisposableScope : IDisposable
{
    private readonly Action _closeScopeAction;
    public DisposableScope(Action closeScopeAction)
    {
        _closeScopeAction = closeScopeAction;
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
        _closeScopeAction();
    }
}
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