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I have a bit map stored as a (fixed) number of unsigned integers, e.g:

1 0 0 1
1 0 1 0
1 1 0 1
0 1 1 0

...is stored as the integer array [ 9, 10, 13, 6 ] (top-down, most significant bit on the left).

I would like to implement a flood-fill algorithm. For instance, if m is the map depicted above, floodFill(m, 3, 2) should produce the map:

1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 1 0 0
0 1 1 0

(Here, 3,2 corresponds to third row (0-indexed), second column (from the right). The answer would be encoded as [ 8, 8, 12, 6 ].)

I can certainly implement one of the standard approaches, but I wonder whether I can do better using bit manipulation tricks.

For instance, if part of the solution is contained in a map m0, I think I m0 | ((m0 >> 1) & m) "grows" the flood fill to the right.

Is this a standard trick to parallelize flood fill on bit maps? Can anyone come up with a complete algorithm? Prove interesting bounds on running time?

Edit: some additional examples:

floodFill ( 0 0 1 1     , 1, 1 ) =  0 0 1 1   
            1 1 1 0                 1 1 1 0
            0 0 1 1                 0 0 1 1
            1 1 0 1                 0 0 0 1

floodFill ( 1 0 0 1     , 1, 2 ) =  0 0 0 0   
            0 1 0 0                 0 1 0 0
            0 1 0 1                 0 1 0 0
            0 0 1 1                 0 0 0 0
share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure to understand your example because you mention third row 0-indexed (i.e. the last one) which is untouched? –  Joky Jan 31 at 0:58
    
@Joky The output is the set of 1 bits from the input that are reachable from the position 3,2. The last row is untouched because both 1 bits are reachable. –  Philippe Jan 31 at 1:27
    
Ok now it is clear. When I see the proposed answer I was not the only one to have it wrong :) –  Joky Jan 31 at 1:31
    
no this is not a good approach because on flood fill you need start sub recursion on any new point. so what you will gain on speed by bit manipulation while line fill then much more time is lost by its decomposition for row fill sub recursions –  Spektre Jan 31 at 9:20
    
@Jarod42 you're right, thanks. Fixed. –  Philippe Jan 31 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Following works:

std::vector<unsigned> floodFill(const std::vector<unsigned>& map, unsigned int row, unsigned int column)
{
    std::vector<unsigned> res(map.size() + 2); // Add 'border' to avoid special case

    res[1 + row] = (1u << column) & map[row]; // Seed point (column: right to left)

    std::vector<unsigned> last;
    do {
        last = res;

        for (std::size_t i = 0, size = map.size(); i != size; ++i) {
            res[i + 1] |= (res[i] | res[i + 2] | (res[i + 1] << 1u) | (res[i + 1] >> 1u)) & map[i];
        }
    } while (last != res);
    res.pop_back();         // remove extra border.
    res.erase(res.begin()); // remove extra border.
    return res;
}

Test it: (I use C++11 here)

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    const std::vector<unsigned int> v = {9, 10, 13, 6};
    const std::vector<unsigned int> expected = {8, 8, 12, 6};
    std::vector<unsigned int> res = floodFill(v, 3, 2);

    assert(res == expected);
    assert(floodFill({3, 14, 3, 13}, 1, 1) == std::vector<unsigned int>({3, 14, 3, 1}));
    assert(floodFill({9, 4, 5, 3}, 1, 2) == std::vector<unsigned int>({0, 4, 4, 0}));
    return 0;
}
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This looks pretty good! I'm just wondering how you can use res[i] as opposed to last[i] when you compute the contribution from previous rows, as you're updating the same rows in the loop. –  Philippe Jan 31 at 17:06
    
Nevermind, it looks like since the changes are monotonic anyway, it is not a problem. You may even save an iteration here or there. –  Philippe Jan 31 at 17:33
    
@Philippe: It s true that I propagate directly changes from row[i] to row[i + 1] in the same loop, but it is not a problem, I see it as an optimization. –  Jarod42 Feb 1 at 13:38
    
BTW, I think the code may be improved (avoid to compute unchanged rows at each loop for example, use a better method to see if there is a change that a vector compare and copy...). –  Jarod42 Feb 1 at 13:42
    
Probably, though in my concrete use case, the rows are in fact the bytes of a single 64bit unsigned. I can compute all shifts in just 8 instructions, and comparison is just one instruction. –  Philippe Feb 1 at 18:12

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