Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to mongodb and am using it to store a nested document. E.g. Each document contains an array of students for each class. I am trying to update the information in each of the array nodes. Is there a better way to do it instead of updating each of the array element one at a time?

Here is my record in the collection -

{
    “_id” : “23343” ,
    “class” : “Physics”,
    “students”: [ 
        { “id” : “2412” , “name” : "Alice", “mentor” : 0 },
        { “id” : “2413” , “name” : "Bob, “mentor” : 0 },
    ]
} 

There are multiple records like this in the collection.

I have a list of these courses I need to update for each record. For example I get an array of students for the above record to update like this -

{
    “_id” : “23343” ,
    “class” : “Physics”,
    “students”: [ 
        { “id” : “2412” , “name” : "Alice", “mentor” : "Mark" },
        { “id” : “2413” , “name” : "Bob, “mentor” : "Jackson" },
    ]
} 

What is the best way to update the record?

I am using python. Intuitively,I can do a find() on the collection for the course. I get a cursor for that. I can do a for each in cursor. I believe mongodb updates the whole document on update().

for record in courseCollection.find():
    recordId = record['_id']
    updatedList = getUpdatedStudentList( record['students'])
    updatedRecord = prepareUpdatedRecord(updatedList)
    courseCollection.update( {'_id' : recordId}, updateList)

The pymongo documentation site does not talk about the set option in the update function. Unless I use that I believe mongodb updates the whole document.

Also calling update with a query option by passing in the _id seems unnecessary because I just did the query and have a handle to the record. Can I somehow use the cursor to do the update there by not do the query for the update again?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I am not so sure what the question is, exactly. In a nutshell: yes, you'll have to update the 'parent' object and yes, you can use $set or replace the entire document, which would be the default behavior. The difference is mostly a matter of locking, concurrency and ownership which is a bit complex. Here's a little more detail on some of your concerns:

Updating a nested mongodb collection using a cursor

Please note that there are no "nested collections", there are only embedded documents. That's important, because the first class citizen in mongodb is always the actual document itself. For instance, a find() will return documents, not subsets of embedded documents alone. You can do projections, but that's only an output transformation, so to speak.

I can do a find() on the collection for the course. I get a cursor for that.

You get a cursor, but since you're querying on the primary key there can only be a single match (primary keys are unique), i.e. you could use findOne() and you don't need to iterate the single result.

E.g. Each document contains an array of students for each class.

These should usually be references to the students, i.e. there should be a separate students collection because you don't want to lose the student because it was temporarily not assigned to any course.

The pymongo documentation site does not talk about the set option in the update function. Unless I use that I believe mongodb updates the whole document.

That's true. You can do a $set on the students array of a document. That avoids overwriting any other fields, such as class. On the other hand, if somebody else has changed the class while your using was editing the students, do the updates still make sense? Unclear ownership is my primary concern with embedded documents.

Also calling update with a query option by passing in the _id seems unnecessary because I just did the query and have a handle to the record

...but what exactly is a handle to the record? A handle is an immutable, unique and usually short identifier. Just like the id. The _id is the handle. I don't know python, but I guess you could write a method that takes a pointer to a database object and performs an update, knowing that every database object must have a field called _id. But from the database's perspective, a pointer in your code is not a handle, but the id is.

share|improve this answer

You can use the $ operator with $elemMatch in an update. Let's start by inserting your document:

collection.insert({
    "_id": "23343",
    "class": "Physics",
    "students": [
        {"id": "2412", "name": "Alice", "mentor": 0},
        {"id": "2413", "name": "Bob", "mentor": 0}]})

Now I'll run two update statements, first adding the mentor "Mark", then "Jackson":

collection.update(
    # Query portion.
    {"_id": "23343", "students": {"$elemMatch": {"id": "2412"}}},
    # Update portion; $ is the position of the matching student.
    {"$set": {"students.$.mentor": "Mark"}})

collection.update(
    # Query portion.
    {"_id": "23343", "students": {"$elemMatch": {"id": "2413"}}},
    {"$set": {"students.$.mentor": "Jackson"}})

Each update statement affects just the "mentor" field of one subdocument in the "students" array.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.