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i have a perl script-

#!/usr/bin/perl;
my $email = '[a-zA-Z0-9._]+@[a-zA-Z0-9._]+.[a-zA-Z0-9._]{2,4}';
open(FILE,'emails');
while (<FILE>) { 
    my $emails_not_found = 1;
    if ( m/$email/ ) { 
        print($_); 
        my $emails_not_found = 0; 
    } 
    if ( $emails_not_found ) {
        print "no emails\n";
    }
}  
close FILE;

the file emails is:

sdfasd@asd 
asdf

so, as you can see, the script will not match regex to any of the lines. however, it outputs this-

no emails
no emails

i want it to output 'no emails' ONCE if it doesn't match the regex pattern at all. If it only matches the regex pattern just once, it will print that line and output 'no emails' for the other line :( I just want it to output either JUST the lines with the emails, or output 1 line that says 'no emails'. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Why are you checking for email addresses using a regex that doesn't check for valid email addresses? :-) – Dave Cross Jan 31 '14 at 11:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this, I changed the emails file name in order to test on my machine:

#!/usr/bin/perl

#output either JUST the lines with emails
# or
#1 line that says 'no emails'
use strict;
use warnings;

my $email = '[a-z0-9\._]+@[a-z0-9\._]+\.[a-z0-9\._]{2,4}';
open(FILE,'./email.txt');
my $emails_not_found = 1;
while (<FILE>) {
    if ( m/$email/i ) {
        print($_);
        $emails_not_found = 0;
    }
}

if ( $emails_not_found == 1) {
    print "no emails\n";
}
close FILE;

Test file

sdfasd@asd
asdf
aaa@aaa.com
AAA@AAA.COM

Output

aaa@aaa.com
AAA@AAA.COM
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much :) I appreciate the elaboration- it made this much easier to understand. just so you know, you don't need to do $emails_not_found == 1, because if the value is 1 or 0, perl can read it as a boolean, so you can write it as if ( $emails_not_found ) – Sawsuh Jan 31 '14 at 7:24

Consider using a module, such as Regexp::Common::Email::Address, "...to match email addresses as defined by RFC 2822":

use strict;
use warnings;
use Regexp::Common qw/Email::Address/;

my $emailFound = 0;
open my $fh, '<', 'emails' or die $!;

while (<$fh>) {
    if (/$RE{Email}{Address}/) {
        print;
        $emailFound = 1;
    }
}

close $fh;

print "no emails\n" if !$emailFound;

Hope this helps!

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