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I'm a complete beginner writing Breakout (the game) in Java. All was going well until I started to get a stack overflow error in the late game. Unfortunately I know that without actually putting the code up online I won't really be able to get help with this. So instead I thought I would make this my first Stackoverflow.com question!

What is a "stack overflow" error, what causes it and how do real programmers deal with them?

Thanks a lot!

(oh, I'm using the acm libraries (I think), if that's any help?)

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12  
It should be the stack-overflow tag. Not the stackoverflow tag. –  user142019 Jan 9 '11 at 18:21
22  
Should this be in meta? :) –  ssedano Jul 26 '11 at 13:45
12  
Is this a recursive question? jk ;) –  Ian Campbell Oct 18 '12 at 3:07
2  
This is like searching Google for Google... –  Pattle Jul 9 '13 at 14:04
3  
What's funny is that the stackoverflow tag answers part the question. –  jpmc26 Aug 4 '13 at 23:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 139 down vote accepted

Parameters and local variables are allocated on the stack (with reference types the object lives on the heap and a variable references that object). The stack typically lives at the upper end of your address space and as it is used up it heads towards the bottom of the address space (i.e. towards zero).

Your process also has a heap, which lives at the bottom end of your process. As you allocate memory this heap can grow towards the upper end of your address space. As you can see, there is the potential for the heap to "collide" with the stack (a bit like tectonic plates!!!).

The common cause for a stack overflow is a bad recursive call. Typically this is caused when your recursive functions doesn't have the correct termination condition, so it ends up calling itself forever. However, with GUI programming it's possible to generate indirect recursion. For example, your app may be handling paint messages and whilst processing them it may call a function that causes the system to send another paint message. Here you've not explicitly called yourself, but the OS/VM has done it for you.

To deal with them you'll need to examine your code. If you've got functions that call themselves then check that you've got a terminating condition. If you have then check than when calling the function you have at least modified one of the arguments, otherwise there'll be no visible change for the recursively called function and the terminating condition is useless.

If you've got no obvious recursive functions then check to see if you're calling any library functions that indirectly will cause your function to be called (like the implicit case above).

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Original poster: hey this is great. So recursion is always responsible for stack overflows? Or can other things be responsible for them as well? Unfortunately I am using a library... but not one that I understand. –  Ziggy Oct 18 '08 at 9:04
2  
Ha ha ha, so here it is: while (points < 100) {addMouseListeners(); moveball(); checkforcollision(); pause(speed);} Wow do I feel lame for not realizing that I would end up with a stackfull of mouse listeners... Thanks guys! –  Ziggy Oct 18 '08 at 11:26
    
No, stack overflows can also come from variables being too big to allocate on the stack if you look up the Wikipedia article on it at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stack_overflow . –  JB King Nov 4 '08 at 23:30
1  
It should be pointed out that it's almost impossible to "handle" a stack overflow error. In most environments, to handle the error one needs to run code on the stack, which is difficult if there is no more stack space. –  Hot Licks Jan 25 at 14:09

If you have a function like:

int foo()
{
    // more stuff
    foo();
}

Then foo() will keep calling itself, getting deeper and deeper, and when the space used to keep track of what functions you're in is filled up, you get the stack overflow error.

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5  
Wrong. Your function is tail-recursive. Most compiled languages have tail-recursion optimizations. This means the recursion reduces into a simple loop and you will never hit stack overflow with this piece of code on some systems. –  Cheery Oct 18 '08 at 9:29
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not in java though. –  Chii Oct 18 '08 at 12:26
    
Cheery, which non-functional languages support tail recursion? –  banister Aug 10 '09 at 19:52
10  
C, C++, Python (with unladen swallow)... –  Clark Gaebel May 19 '10 at 1:38
    
@wowus +1 for holy grail –  Cyclone Jul 3 '10 at 13:33

Stack overflow means exactly that: a stack overflows. Usually there's a one stack in the program that contains local-scope variables and addresses where to return when execution of a routine ends. That stack tends to be a fixed memory range somewhere in the memory, therefore it's limited how much it can contain values.

If the stack is empty you can't pop, if you do you'll get stack underflow error.

If the stack is full you can't push, if you do you'll get stack overflow error.

So stack overflow appears where you allocate too much into the stack. For instance, in the mentioned recursion.

Some implementations optimize out some forms of recursions. Tail recursion in particular. Tail recursive routines are form of routines where the recursive call appears as a final thing what the routine does. Such routine call gets simply reduced into a jump.

Some implementations go so far as implement their own stacks for recursion, therefore they allow the recursion to continue until the system runs out of memory.

Easiest thing you could try would be to increase your stack size if you can. If you can't do that though, the second best thing would be to look whether there's something that clearly causes the stack overflow. Try it by printing something before and after the call into routine. This helps you to find out the failing routine.

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3  
Is there such a thing as a stack underflow ? –  Pacerier Jan 29 '12 at 14:09
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A stack underflow is possible in assembly (popping more than you pushed), though in compiled languages it'd be near impossible. I'm not sure, you might be able to find an implementation of C's alloca() which "supports" negative sizes. –  Score_Under Feb 9 '13 at 0:14

A stack overflow is usually called by nesting function calls too deeply (especially easy when using recursion, i.e. a function that calls itself) or allocating a large amount of memory on the stack where using the heap would be more appropriate.

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Oops, didn't see the Java tag –  Greg Oct 18 '08 at 8:23
    
Also, from the original poster here: nesting functions too deeply in what? Other functions? And: how does one allocate memory to the stack or heap (since, you know, I've clearly done one of these things without knowing). –  Ziggy Oct 18 '08 at 8:26
    
@Ziggy: Yes, if one function calls another function, which calls yet another function, and so on, after many levels, your program will have a stack overflow. [continues] –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 18 '08 at 9:25
    
[...continued] In Java, you can't directly allocate memory from the stack (whereas in C, you can, and this would then be something to watch for), so that's unlikely to be the cause. In Java, all direct allocations come from the heap, by using "new". –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 18 '08 at 9:26
    
@ChrisJester-Young Isn't it true that if I have 100 local variables in a method, all of it goes on the stack without exceptions? –  Pacerier Jan 29 '12 at 14:08

Like you say, you need to show some code. :-)

A stack overflow error usually happens when your function calls nest too deeply. See the Stack Overflow Code Golf thread for some examples of how this happens (though in the case of that question, the answers intentionally cause stack overflow).

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I would totally like to add code, but as I don't know what causes stack overflows I am not sure what code to add. adding all the code would be lame, no? –  Ziggy Oct 18 '08 at 8:27
    
Is your project open-source? If so, just make a Sourceforge or github account, and upload all your code there. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 18 '08 at 9:37
    
this sounds like a great idea, but I am such a noob that I don't even know what I would have to upload. Like, the library that I am importing classes that I am extending etc... are all unknowns to me. Oh man: bad times. –  Ziggy Oct 18 '08 at 9:49

The most common cause of stack overflows is excessively deep or infinite recursion. If this is your problem, this tutorial about Java Recursion could help understand the problem.

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Following would give StackOverflowError:

class  StackOverflowDemo
{
    public static void badRecursiveCall() {
     badRecursiveCall();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        badRecursiveCall();
    }
}
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Here is an example of a recursive algorithm for reversing a singly linked list. On a laptop with the following spec (4G memory, Intel Core i5 2.3GHz CPU, 64 bit Windows 7), this function will run into StackOverflow error for a linked list of size close to 10,000.

My point is that we should use recursion judiciously, always taking into account of the scale of the system. Often recursion can be converted to iterative program, which scales better. (One iterative version of the same algorithm is given at the bottom of the page, it reverses a singly linked list of size 1 million in 9 milliseconds.)

    private static LinkedListNode doReverseRecursively(LinkedListNode x, LinkedListNode first){

    LinkedListNode second = first.next;

    first.next = x;

    if(second != null){
        return doReverseRecursively(first, second);
    }else{
        return first;
    }
}

public static LinkedListNode reverseRecursively(LinkedListNode head){
    return doReverseRecursively(null, head);
}

Iterative Version of the Same Algorithm:

    public static LinkedListNode reverseIteratively(LinkedListNode head){
    return doReverseIteratively(null, head);
}   

private static LinkedListNode doReverseIteratively(LinkedListNode x, LinkedListNode first) {

    while (first != null) {
        LinkedListNode second = first.next;
        first.next = x;
        x = first;

        if (second == null) {
            break;
        } else {
            first = second;
        }
    }
    return first;
}


public static LinkedListNode reverseIteratively(LinkedListNode head){
    return doReverseIteratively(null, head);
}
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I think with JVM, it doesn't actually matter what the spec your laptop is. –  kevin Oct 24 '13 at 1:48

The term "stack overrun (overflow)" is often used but a misnomer; attacks do not overflow the stack but buffers on the stack.

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