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I have loaded an assembly called 'Mscorlib.dll' and i wanted it to list all classes within the 'Mscorlib', which it does(using reflection). Now I want to add a function whereby the user inputs a class from the assembly and it gets all the methods from that class.

How would i go around doing this? Any help would be nice

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why would you want to load the MSCORLIB.DLL, that is the runtime library for all .NET executables and is referenced by default but not shown in the references in Visual studio... –  t0mm13b Jan 27 '10 at 15:35
    
You could use Net Reflector (part of Redgate) to see how in conjunction with Jon's answer below to obtain the expected results.. –  t0mm13b Jan 27 '10 at 15:36
    
Hello, this is nothing too serious. I'm just practicing coding and how I can get information using reflection. Thanks for advice anyway. –  MW. Jan 27 '10 at 15:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use Assembly.GetType(type) to get the appropriate Type, then Type.GetMethods to get the methods within it. (Note that the overload which doesn't take a BindingFlags will only return public methods.)

For example (no error checking):

Assembly mscorlib = typeof(int).Assembly;
Console.Write("Type name? ");
string typeName = Console.ReadLine();
Type type = mscorlib.GetType(typeName);
foreach (MethodInfo method in type.GetMethods())
{
    Console.WriteLine(method);
}
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Yes, I have already done this Jon but now I want the user to search the mscorlib for a class and that will show the methods of that class chosen. I do not want a full list of methods for the mscorlib as it seems there is too much information. –  MW. Jan 27 '10 at 15:20
    
Um, that's exactly what I've shown you - note the call to Assembly.GetType(string) rather than Assembly.GetTypes(). Just call GetMethods on a single type rather than every type within the assembly. –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '10 at 15:23
    
That really helped thank you! –  MW. Jan 27 '10 at 15:32

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