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When using the collection initializers in C# 3.0, is the initial capacity of the collection inferred from the number of elements used to initialize the collection? For example, is

List<int> digits = new List<int> { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

equivalent to

List<int> digits = new List<int>(10) { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
share|improve this question
    
(I've corrected your version number, btw - 3.5 is the version of the framework; 3.0 is the version of the C# language.) – Jon Skeet Jan 27 '10 at 15:21
    
You could have corrected the typo in the title while you were at it. :-) I have to admit that I tried it before posting the question and knew the answer (the first one's initial capacity was 16 in this case), but I posted anyway hoping for some interesting answers. I was hoping to award the points to someone who needs them but first is first. – Jamie Ide Jan 27 '10 at 15:28
up vote 4 down vote accepted

No.

List<int> digits = new List<int> { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

is equivalent to

List<int> temp = new List<int>();
temp.Add(0);
temp.Add(1);    
temp.Add(2);    
temp.Add(3);    
temp.Add(4);    
temp.Add(5);    
temp.Add(6);    
temp.Add(7);    
temp.Add(8);    
temp.Add(9);    
List<int> digits = temp;

The number of items being added doesn't automatically change the initial capacity. If you're adding more than 16 items through the collection initializer you can combine the constructor and initializer like this:

List<int> digits = new List<int>(32) { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 };
share|improve this answer

No, it's equivalent to:

// Note the () after <int> - we're calling the parameterless constructor
List<int> digits = new List<int>() { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

In other words, the C# compiler doesn't know or care what the parameterless constructor will do - but that's what it will call. It's up to the collection itself to decide what its initial capacity is (if it even has such a concept - a linked list doesn't, for example).

share|improve this answer
    
I recommend trying to highlight the added parentheses as they get lost inside that line. – Jeff Yates Jan 27 '10 at 15:23
    
@Jeff: Good call – Jon Skeet Jan 27 '10 at 15:24
3  
This answer is somewhat incomplete. List<int> digits = new List<int> { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 }; is equivalent to List<int> digits = new List<int>(); digits.Add(0); digits.Add(1); ... digits.Add(9); The constructor never sees the elements of the collection initializer list. Thus, from the perspective of the constructor, the initializer list plays no role in determining the initial capacity. – jason Jan 27 '10 at 15:31
    
@Jason, actually it's equivalent to using a temp variable to call the constructor, add the items, and then assigning the temp back to the original variable. The difference here is that if an error occurs in one of the Add() calls, the temp is automatically discarded (as there are no references to it) and the variable "digits" is never assigned anything. – Samuel Neff Jan 27 '10 at 18:06
    
This answer was only meant to address the constructor call, as the question was comparing a collection initializer with an explicit constructor argument list with one without an argument list. – Jon Skeet Jan 27 '10 at 18:53

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