Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having a method called LoadData which gets data from DataBase and fills a DataGridView.

I am using a Stopwatch to measure how long my method takes to finish it's job as below :

private void btnLoadData_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
    sw.Start();
    LoadData ();
    sw.Stop();
    ShowTakenTime(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

I want something that can do The following :

private void MeasureTime(Method m)
{
    var sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
    sw.Start();
    m.Invoke();
    sw.Stop();
    ShowTakenTime(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

so that I can pass the LoadData method to it and it does the rest for me.

MeasureTime(LoadData());

How can I do that?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For a method without parameters and returning void, you can use Action:

    private void MeasureTime(Action m)
    {
        var sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        m();
        sw.Stop();
        ShowTakenTime(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

If you have some parameters or a return type, use Func

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, and what if I had parameters? –  Mahdi Tahsildari Jan 31 at 14:26
    
Use Func (see updated response) –  AlexH Jan 31 at 14:27
    
As the last question, what if my Func had no parameter but I expected it to return an int? –  Mahdi Tahsildari Jan 31 at 14:52
    
In that case just use the Func<int> m = () => { return 42; }; msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb534960(v=vs.110).aspx –  AlexH Jan 31 at 15:04
1  
The MeasureTime method in this answer takes an Action because it doesn't care. You can wrap any method in a lambda which matches Action, as in this example: MeasureTime(() => { localResult = MethodWithArgsAndRet(localArg1, localArg2, localArg3); });. The variables called "local" are simply captured by the anonymous function (lambda). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 31 at 15:59

Use delegates

private void MeasureTime(System.Action a)
{
    var sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
    sw.Start();
    a();
    sw.Stop();
    ShowTakenTime(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}
share|improve this answer

You can use Action because you are not returning anything:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/018hxwa8(v=vs.110).aspx

 MeasureTime(Action action)
 Action act = LoadData;
 act.Invoke();
share|improve this answer

If you want to pass parameters to your Method m, use an Action<...>, for example if you want to pass an int and a string to your Method, use Action<int,string>

private void MeasureTime(Action<int, string> m)
{
   var sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
   sw.Start();
   m(42, "Hello World");
   sw.Stop();
   ShowTakenTime(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

If you need to access the return value of your Method, use Func<...>:

private void MeasureTime(Func<int, string, string> m)
{
   var sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
   sw.Start();
   var result = m(42, "Hello World");
   sw.Stop();
   ShowTakenTime(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}
share|improve this answer

define a delegate in your class with any signature you want:

delegate int YourDelegate(string s);

a method that get delegate and run it

void CallerMethod(YourDelegate method)
{
    int result = method("");
}

method is going to pass and is compatible with YourDelegate:

int MethodToPass(string s)
{
    throw new exception();
}

pass MethodToPass to CallerMewthod:

CallerMethod(MethodToPass);

also you can instead of declaring a new delegates, you can use predefined Func<output, inputType1, inputType2, ...> generic delegate that supports any type of input and output

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.