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I've just made this experiment:

class A < Hash
  def foo
    'foo'
  end
end

class A < Hash
  def bar 
    'bar'
  end
end

So far I get the result I expected, the second declaration extends the first one. However I was surprised of this:

class A
  def call
    puts foo
    puts bar
  end
end

The code above works, but only if I declare it later. Otherwise I get:

TypeError: superclass mismatch for class A

Can I assume that in Ruby, it is safe skipping the superclass specification without side effects after making sure that the "original-first" declaration was parsed?

share|improve this question
    
Yes, that is correct. – Holger Just Jan 31 '14 at 15:16
    
In you last attempt, it tries to make an Object class, as its superclass.. So the error you got.. and it is expected.. – Arup Rakshit Jan 31 '14 at 15:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are able to declare inheritance only on the first occurince of the class definition, so below variants will work:

  1. When you've defined the same class inheritance:

    class A < Hash
    end
    
    class A < Hash
    end
    
  2. When you've used default inheritance in the second case, that is treated as undefined inheritance:

    class A < Hash
    end
    
    class A
    end
    
  3. When you've used default inheritance in both cases, the default inheritance is of Object class:

    class A
    end
    
    class A
    end
    

And below will not:

  1. When you've used default inheritance in the first case, and next you tried to redefine it explicitly:

    class A
    end
    
    class A < Hash
    end
    
    TypeError: superclass mismatch for class A
    
  2. When you've used specified inheritance (in example String) in the first case, and next you tried to redefine it explicitly (in example with Hash):

    class A < String
    end
    
    class A < Hash
    end
    
    TypeError: superclass mismatch for class A
    
share|improve this answer

@Малъ Скрылевъ explained this case a better way, so I wouldn't attempt that. But I would show you another way to do this.

One way to avoid the error is in your situation :

Instead of writing

class A
  def call
    puts foo
    puts bar
  end
end

Write it as below using Module#class_eval:

Evaluates the string or block in the context of mod, except that when a block is given, constant/class variable lookup is not affected. This can be used to add methods to a class. module_eval returns the result of evaluating its argument.

A.class_eval do
  def _call
    puts foo
    puts bar
  end
end
share|improve this answer

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