Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code:

void A(const int*)
{
    cout << "const int*" << endl;
}

void A(const int&)
{
    cout << "const int&" << endl;
}

template <typename T>
void B(const T*)
{
    cout << "const T*" << endl;
}

template <typename T>
void B(const T&)
{
    cout << "const T&" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    int* a = nullptr;
    A(a);            //output: const int*

    int* b = nullptr;
    B(b);            //output: const T&

    return 0;
}

A(a) is invoking the function A(const int*)
B(b) is invoking the template function B(const T&)

I am not surprised from the template behaviour because of the way overload resolution works. But I cannot explain why the non-templated functions return the opposite result (which is kinda the more intuitive).

Is it because with the non-templated functions there is no need for the type to be deduced and is considered exact match (adding const-ness is permited?) ?

I am not an expert with meta programming and the things that the compiler is doing (like overload resolution) and that's why I am a bit confused.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the call to the non-template, you are passing a pointer to an int. So how could it call the function which is expecting a reference to an int? The two are completely different types. And yes, adding const is permitted. If you had overloaded on constness though:

void A(const int*)
{
    cout << "const int*" << endl;
}

void A(int*)
{
    cout << "int*" << endl;
}

The non-const version would be selected as a better match.

With the template, things are different. Remember that pointers are types too. It is just as valid to deduce T as a pointer type. When you call B(b), the compiler can use this function:

template <typename T>
void B(const T*)
{
    cout << "const T*" << endl;
}

In which case T must be deduced as int, and const T* becomes const int*, a pointer to a const int.

Or the compiler can choose this function:

template <typename T>
void B(const T&)
{
    cout << "const T&" << endl;
}

In which case T is deduced as int*. And const T& then becomes int* const&, that is, a reference to a const pointer to int.

Since, in the second case, T maps exactly to what you actually passed in (a pointer to an int), it is the better match.

share|improve this answer
    
He's asking why it's calling the non-templated A over the templated A, not why it's not calling B. –  William Custode Jan 31 at 16:15
    
@WilliamCustode: No, he's not. There is no templated A. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 31 at 16:16
    
@WilliamCustode there is no A function template. –  juanchopanza Jan 31 at 16:17
    
Misread that. My bad. –  William Custode Jan 31 at 16:17
    
I am asking why the behaviour with templates is different from the non-templated versions. I pass again pointer to int in B(b) call and it is calling the B(const T&), not B(const T*) –  Geto Jan 31 at 16:20

No, the behavior is not different.

With B, T gets resolved to int* and the second overload's

int* const&

is a better match than the first overload's

int const*

Note that both are feasible, just the first one is better. So basically the template lets you get the most permissible access.

For A, there is really only one option, since the pointer is not convertible to a reference, and that is to drop the const.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.