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I wrote a confusion matrix calculation code in Python:

def conf_mat(prob_arr, input_arr):
        # confusion matrix
        conf_arr = [[0, 0], [0, 0]]

        for i in range(len(prob_arr)):
                if int(input_arr[i]) == 1:
                        if float(prob_arr[i]) < 0.5:
                                conf_arr[0][1] = conf_arr[0][1] + 1
                        else:
                                conf_arr[0][0] = conf_arr[0][0] + 1
                elif int(input_arr[i]) == 2:
                        if float(prob_arr[i]) >= 0.5:
                                conf_arr[1][0] = conf_arr[1][0] +1
                        else:
                                conf_arr[1][1] = conf_arr[1][1] +1

        accuracy = float(conf_arr[0][0] + conf_arr[1][1])/(len(input_arr))

prob_arr is an array that my classification code returned and a sample array is like this:

 [1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.41592955657342651, 1.0, 0.0053405015805891975, 4.5321494433440449e-299, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.70943426182688163, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0]

input_arr is the original class labels for a dataset and it is like this:

[2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1]

What my code is trying to do is: i get prob_arr and input_arr and for each class (1 and 2) I check if they are misclassified or not.

But my code only works for two classes. If I run this code for a multiple classed data, it doesn't work. How can I make this for multiple classes?

For example for a three classed data, it should return me: [[21,7,3],[3,38,6],[5,4,19]]

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8 Answers 8

Scikit-learn (which I recommend using anyways) has it included in the metrics module:

>>> from sklearn.metrics import confusion_matrix
>>> y_true = [0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2]
>>> y_pred = [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 2, 2]
>>> confusion_matrix(y_true, y_pred)
array([[3, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 1]])
share|improve this answer

Scikit-Learn provide a confusion_matrix function

from sklearn.metrics import confusion_matrix
y_actu = [2, 0, 2, 2, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, 2]
y_pred = [0, 0, 2, 1, 0, 2, 1, 0, 2, 0, 2, 2]
confusion_matrix(y_pred, y_actu)

which output a Numpy array

array([[3, 0, 2],
       [0, 1, 1],
       [0, 2, 3]])

But you can also create a confusion matrix using Pandas:

import pandas as pd
y_actu = pd.Series([2, 0, 2, 2, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, 2])
y_pred = pd.Series([0, 0, 2, 1, 0, 2, 1, 0, 2, 0, 2, 2])

df_confusion = pd.crosstab(y_actu, y_pred, rownames=['Actual'], colnames=['Predicted'])

You will get a (nicely labeled) Pandas DataFrame:

Predicted  0  1  2
Actual
0          3  0  0
1          0  1  2
2          2  1  3

If you add margins=True like

df_confusion = pd.crosstab(y_actu, y_pred, rownames=['Actual'], colnames=['Predicted'], margins=True)

you will get also sum for each row and column:

Predicted  0  1  2  All
Actual
0          3  0  0    3
1          0  1  2    3
2          2  1  3    6
All        5  2  5   12

You can also get a normalized confusion matrix using:

df_conf_norm = df_confusion / df_confusion.sum(axis=1)

Predicted         0         1         2
Actual
0          1.000000  0.000000  0.000000
1          0.000000  0.333333  0.333333
2          0.666667  0.333333  0.500000

You can plot this confusion_matrix using

def plot_confusion_matrix(df_confusion, title='Confusion matrix', cmap=plt.cm.gray_r):
    plt.matshow(df_confusion, cmap=cmap) # imshow
    #plt.title(title)
    plt.colorbar()
    tick_marks = np.arange(len(df_confusion.columns))
    plt.xticks(tick_marks, df_confusion.columns, rotation=45)
    plt.yticks(tick_marks, df_confusion.index)
    #plt.tight_layout()
    plt.ylabel(df_confusion.index.name)
    plt.xlabel(df_confusion.columns.name)

plot_confusion_matrix(df_confusion)

plot confusion matrix

Or plot normalized confusion matrix using:

plot_confusion_matrix(df_conf_norm)  

plot confusion matrix normalized

You might also be interested by my project https://github.com/scls19fr/pandas_confusion and its Pip package https://pypi.python.org/pypi/pandas_confusion

With this package confusion matrix can be pretty-printed, plot. You can binarize a confusion matrix, get class statistics such as TP, TN, FP, FN, ACC, TPR, FPR, FNR, TNR (SPC), LR+, LR-, DOR, PPV, FDR, FOR, NPV and some overall statistics.

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Here's a confusion matrix class that supports pretty-printing, etc:

http://nltk.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/doc/api/nltk.metrics.confusionmatrix-pysrc.html

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1  
Authentication required :( –  Andrew Dec 3 '14 at 21:27
    
This one works though (at least when I made this comment it did): nltk.org/_modules/nltk/metrics/confusionmatrix.html –  Andrew Dec 3 '14 at 21:49

This function creates confusion matrices for any number of classes.

def create_conf_matrix(expected, predicted, n_classes):
    m = [[0] * n_classes for i in range(n_classes)]
    for pred, exp in zip(predicted, expected):
        m[pred][exp] += 1
    return m

def calc_accuracy(conf_matrix):
    t = sum(sum(l) for l in conf_matrix)
    return sum(conf_matrix[i][i] for i in range(len(conf_matrix))) / t

In contrast to your function above, you have to extract the predicted classes before calling the function, based on your classification results, i.e. sth. like

[1 if p < .5 else 2 for p in classifications]
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This like gives a syntax error, I am not good enough in Python to fix it though :) m = [[0] * n_classes] for i in range(n_classes)] ^ SyntaxError: invalid syntax –  Stephen T. Jan 27 '10 at 17:34
    
I think you need one more [: m = [[[0] * ... –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 27 '10 at 17:54
    
Actually, it's one less:)---fixed. –  Torsten Marek Jan 27 '10 at 17:56
    
s/observed/predicted/ –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 27 '10 at 18:22
    
You might have created transposed confusion matrix. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 27 '10 at 18:27

You should map from classes to a row in your confusion matrix.

Here the mapping is trivial:

def row_of_class(classe):
    return {1: 0, 2: 1}[classe]

In your loop, compute expected_row, correct_row, and increment conf_arr[expected_row][correct_row]. You'll even have less code than what you started with.

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In a general sense, you're going to need to change your probability array. Instead of having one number for each instance and classifying based on whether or not it is greater than 0.5, you're going to need a list of scores (one for each class), then take the largest of the scores as the class that was chosen (a.k.a. argmax).

You could use a dictionary to hold the probabilities for each classification:

prob_arr = [{classification_id: probability}, ...]

Choosing a classification would be something like:

for instance_scores in prob_arr :
    predicted_classes = [cls for (cls, score) in instance_scores.iteritems() if score = max(instance_scores.values())]

This handles the case where two classes have the same scores. You can get one score, by choosing the first one in that list, but how you handle that depends on what you're classifying.

Once you have your list of predicted classes and a list of expected classes you can use code like Torsten Marek's to create the confusion array and calculate the accuracy.

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You can make your code more concise and (sometimes) to run faster using numpy. For example, in two-classes case your function can be rewritten as (see mply.acc()):

def accuracy(actual, predicted):
    """accuracy = (tp + tn) / ts

    , where:    

        ts - Total Samples
        tp - True Positives
        tn - True Negatives
    """
    return (actual == predicted).sum() / float(len(actual))

, where:

actual    = (numpy.array(input_arr) == 2)
predicted = (numpy.array(prob_arr) < 0.5)
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If you don't want scikit-learn to do the work for you...

    import numpy
    actual = numpy.array(actual)
    predicted = numpy.array(predicted)

    # calculate the confusion matrix; labels is numpy array of classification labels
    cm = numpy.zeros((len(labels), len(labels)))
    for a, p in zip(actual, predicted):
        cm[a][p] += 1

    # also get the accuracy easily with numpy
    accuracy = (actual == predicted).sum() / float(len(actual))

Or take a look at a more complete implementation here in NLTK.

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