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I have an internet-explorer only web application.

I'm exploring what we can do to automate the testing.

Selenium looks like a good tool, but to be able to activate links etc I need to tell selenium where they are. The application wasn't built with this kind of testing in mind, so there generally aren't id attributes on the key elements.

No problem, I think, I can use Xpath expressions. But finding the correct Xpath for say, a button, is a royal pain if done by inspecting the source of the page.

With Firefox / Firebug, I can select the element then use "Copy Xpath" to get the expression. Is there any way of doing this with IE?

(I have the IE Developer Toolbar and it's frustratingly close - I can click to select the element of interest, display all sorts of information about it... but I can't see any convenient way of determining the Xpath for it)

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You say "internet-explorer only". Does this mean that you can't even open the application in Firefox? Or just that it needs to work flawlessly in IE, regardless of whether it works in other browsers? –  pkaeding Oct 18 '08 at 12:15
    
Updated my answer to give code. Note you have to select an element to get its XPath, can be annoying for some active components, but I think it can be a good starting point anyway. –  PhiLho Oct 18 '08 at 21:04
    
Yes, it really is IE only. It won't even load in Firefox (the app checks for browser type explicitly) –  Paul Oct 21 '08 at 15:36
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would use bookmarklets. I have one XPath related, but I don't know if it works in IE. I gotta go but I will test it and give it if it works on IE.

Two bookmarklet sites for Web developers from my bookmarks: Subsimple's bookmarklets and Squarefree's Bookmarklets. Lot of useful things there...

[EDIT] OK, I am back. The bookmarklet I had was for FF only, and wasn't optimal. I finally rewrote it, although using ideas from the original one. Can't find back where I found it.

Expanded JS:

function getNode(node)
{
  var nodeExpr = node.tagName;
  if (nodeExpr == null)  // Eg. node = #text
    return null;
  if (node.id != '')
  {
    nodeExpr += "[@id='" + node.id + "']";
    // We don't really need to go back up to //HTML, since IDs are supposed
    // to be unique, so they are a good starting point.
    return "/" + nodeExpr;
  }
// We don't really need this
//~   if (node.className != '')
//~   {
//~     nodeExpr += "[@class='" + node.className + "']";
//~   }
  // Find rank of node among its type in the parent
  var rank = 1;
  var ps = node.previousSibling;
  while (ps != null)
  {
    if (ps.tagName == node.tagName)
    {
      rank++;
    }
    ps = ps.previousSibling;
  }
  if (rank > 1)
  {
    nodeExpr += '[' + rank + ']';
  }
  else
  {
    // First node of its kind at this level. Are there any others?
    var ns = node.nextSibling;
    while (ns != null)
    {
      if (ns.tagName == node.tagName)
      {
        // Yes, mark it as being the first one
        nodeExpr += '[1]';
        break;
      }
      ns = ns.nextSibling;
    }
  }
  return nodeExpr;
}

var currentNode;
// Standard (?)
if (window.getSelection != undefined) 
  currentNode = window.getSelection().anchorNode;
// IE (if no selection, that's BODY)
else 
  currentNode = document.selection.createRange().parentElement();
if (currentNode == null)
{
  alert("No selection");
  return;
}
var path = [];
// Walk up the Dom
while (currentNode != undefined)
{
  var pe = getNode(currentNode);
  if (pe != null)
  {
    path.push(pe);
    if (pe.indexOf('@id') != -1)
      break;  // Found an ID, no need to go upper, absolute path is OK
  }
  currentNode = currentNode.parentNode;
}
var xpath = "/" + path.reverse().join('/');
alert(xpath);
// Copy to clipboard
// IE
if (window.clipboardData) clipboardData.setData("Text", xpath);
// FF's code to handle clipboard is much more complex 
// and might need to change prefs to allow changing the clipboard content.
// I omit it here as it isn't part of the original request.

You have to select the element and activate the bookmarklet to get its XPath.

Now, the bookmarklet versions (thanks to Bookmarklet Builder):

IE
(I had to break it in two parts, because IE doesn't like very long bookmarklets (max size varies depending on IE versions!). You have to activate the first one (function def) then the second one. Tested with IE6.)

javascript:function getNode(node){var nodeExpr=node.tagName;if(!nodeExpr)return null;if(node.id!=''){nodeExpr+="[@id='"+node.id+"']";return "/"+nodeExpr;}var rank=1;var ps=node.previousSibling;while(ps){if(ps.tagName==node.tagName){rank++;}ps=ps.previousSibling;}if(rank>1){nodeExpr+='['+rank+']';}else{var ns=node.nextSibling;while(ns){if(ns.tagName==node.tagName){nodeExpr+='[1]';break;}ns=ns.nextSibling;}}return nodeExpr;}
javascript:function o__o(){var currentNode=document.selection.createRange().parentElement();var path=[];while(currentNode){var pe=getNode(currentNode);if(pe){path.push(pe);if(pe.indexOf('@id')!=-1)break;}currentNode=currentNode.parentNode;}var xpath="/"+path.reverse().join('/');clipboardData.setData("Text", xpath);}o__o();

FF

javascript:function o__o(){function getNode(node){var nodeExpr=node.tagName;if(nodeExpr==null)return null;if(node.id!=''){nodeExpr+="[@id='"+node.id+"']";return "/"+nodeExpr;}var rank=1;var ps=node.previousSibling;while(ps!=null){if(ps.tagName==node.tagName){rank++;}ps=ps.previousSibling;}if(rank>1){nodeExpr+='['+rank+']';}else{var ns=node.nextSibling;while(ns!=null){if(ns.tagName==node.tagName){nodeExpr+='[1]';break;}ns=ns.nextSibling;}}return nodeExpr;}var currentNode=window.getSelection().anchorNode;if(currentNode==null){alert("No selection");return;}var path=[];while(currentNode!=undefined){var pe=getNode(currentNode);if(pe!=null){path.push(pe);if(pe.indexOf('@id')!=-1)break;}currentNode=currentNode.parentNode;}var xpath="/"+path.reverse().join('/');alert(xpath);}o__o();
share|improve this answer
    
Looks interesting, but I've no idea how to add a bookmarklet :( Can you point me at at something that explains this? –  Paul Oct 19 '08 at 13:26
    
I hope you get such answer... To add a bookmarklet is dead simple: copy the javascript: line (one by one in the case of my IE marklets) and paste it in the address bar of the browser (and hit Return). You can then add it to favorites (they are called favlets too) to call them back. JS is then run. –  PhiLho Oct 19 '08 at 22:09
    
I get "Error: ps is null. Source file: javascript:function%..." Is this code now defunct in FF 3.5.5? –  Photodeus Nov 8 '09 at 20:17
    
@Photodeus: Oops! Obviously you are the first one to test the FF version... I had a typo, a ps instead of ns (in ns=ps.nextSibling). Fixed in the answer. Thanks for reporting. –  PhiLho Nov 9 '09 at 10:32
    
Interesting code. I wonder if this code could be adapted to test a given XPath of an element in the DOM. E.g. pass in an XPath and it returns back reference to DOM element if found or null/undefined otherwise. Something like document.getElementByXPath(), document.getElementsByXPath(). There's technique to do it for other browsers, but seems same technique code don't work on IE. autumnator.wordpress.com/2013/05/02/… –  David Jun 28 '13 at 22:52
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Since bookmarklet use puzzled Paul, I though I should add a little introduction to their usage. I do it in a separate message to avoid mixing stuff.

Bookmarklets (also called favlets) are little JavaScript scripts (sic) designed to be pasted in the address bar of the browser (like any other URL) and thus to run on the current page.
After running it (paste, hit Enter), you can bookmark it for reuse (add it to favorites in IE). Note that the browser might bookmark the original URL instead, you have then to edit the bookmark and replace the URL with your script.
Of course, you can add it to the URL bar for quick access too.

These scripts act like being part of the current page, accessing global JS variables and functions, Dom objects, etc.
They can be super simple, like the seminal javascript: alert("Hello world!"); or quite complex like the one above. If it returns a value (or if last expression has a value), the value replaces the current page. To avoid this, you can finish the script with alert (to display a result) or wrap the script in a function definition and call this function, like I did above. (Some also put void(0); at the end, but I saw it is seen as bad practice.)

The function solution has the advantage of making all variables of the script local to the applet (if declared with var, of course), avoiding interferences/side-effects with scripts on the local page. That's also why the wrapping function should have a name unlikely to clash with a local script.

Note that some browsers (read: "IE") can limit the size of favlets, the max. length varying with version (tending to decrease). That's why all useless whitespace is removed (the bookmarlet builder linked above is good for that) and I removed the explict comparisons with null and undefined I usually do. I had also to split the favlet in two, first part defining a function (living as long as the page isn't changed/refreshed), second part using it.

Useful tool, particularly on browsers not allowing user scripts (à la Greasemonkey) or without this extension.

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there's a toolbar named "ie debugbar" you can use it to find the exact xpath..

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I have rewritten the bookmarklet code into C#, so if you'll find it useful, use it ;-)

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

namespace Anotation.Toolbar
{
    class XPath
    {
        public static string getXPath(mshtml.IHTMLElement element)
        {
            if (element == null)
                return "";
            mshtml.IHTMLElement currentNode = element;
            ArrayList path = new ArrayList();

            while (currentNode != null)
            {
                string pe = getNode(currentNode);
                if (pe != null)
                {
                    path.Add(pe);
                    if (pe.IndexOf("@id") != -1)
                        break;  // Found an ID, no need to go upper, absolute path is OK
                }
                currentNode = currentNode.parentElement;
            }
            path.Reverse();
            return join(path, "/");
        }

        private static string join(ArrayList items, string delimiter)
        {
          StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
          foreach (object item in items)
          {
            if (item == null)
                continue;

            sb.Append(delimiter);
            sb.Append(item);
          }
          return sb.ToString();
        }

        private static string getNode(mshtml.IHTMLElement node)
        {
            string nodeExpr = node.tagName;
            if (nodeExpr == null)  // Eg. node = #text
                return null;
            if (node.id != "" && node.id != null)
            {
                nodeExpr += "[@id='" + node.id + "']";
                // We don't really need to go back up to //HTML, since IDs are supposed
                // to be unique, so they are a good starting point.
                return "/" + nodeExpr;
            }

            // Find rank of node among its type in the parent
            int rank = 1;
            mshtml.IHTMLDOMNode nodeDom = node as mshtml.IHTMLDOMNode;
            mshtml.IHTMLDOMNode psDom = nodeDom.previousSibling;
            mshtml.IHTMLElement ps = psDom as mshtml.IHTMLElement;
            while (ps != null)
            {
                if (ps.tagName == node.tagName)
                {
                    rank++;
                }
                psDom = psDom.previousSibling;
                ps = psDom as mshtml.IHTMLElement;
            }
            if (rank > 1)
            {
                nodeExpr += "[" + rank + "]";
            }
            else
            { // First node of its kind at this level. Are there any others?
                mshtml.IHTMLDOMNode nsDom = nodeDom.nextSibling;
                mshtml.IHTMLElement ns = nsDom as mshtml.IHTMLElement;
                while (ns != null)
                {
                    if (ns.tagName == node.tagName)
                    { // Yes, mark it as being the first one
                        nodeExpr += "[1]";
                        break;
                    }
                    nsDom = nsDom.nextSibling;
                    ns = nsDom as mshtml.IHTMLElement;
                }
            }
            return nodeExpr;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How would you use this C# version then? –  David Jun 28 '13 at 22:47
    
I tried this code and it works fine except it fails to convert the COM object into IHTMLElement when the HTML element is INPUT <code> mshtml.IHTMLElement ps = psDom as mshtml.IHTMLElement; </code> can anybody point out the reason? –  user1283104 Sep 28 '13 at 17:32
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