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I'm iterating over an array of words and trying to stuff them in an object literal so I can assign the value of how many times those words occur to each word in the literal/dictionary. The problem is I need to check to make sure that word hasn't already been added into my literal. I tried using in to check if the property exists in the literal but it's throwing an error:

Cannot use 'in' operator to search for 'We' in undefined

Here's problematic function:

I commented the line that's causing the problem

function wordCountDict(filename) {
   wordCount = {};
   inputFile = fs.readFile( root + filename, 'utf8', function( error, data ) {  
      if(error) {
         console.log('error: ', error) 
         return false;
      }

      var words = data.split(" ");
      for (i in words) {

         if(words[i] in wordCount) {  // This is where the problem occurs
            wordCount[words[i]]++;
         } else {
            wordCount[words[i]] = 1;
         }
         console.log(words[i]);
      }

   });
}

I'm coming from python and this was always the best/easiest way to achieve this, but javascript doesn't seem to agree.

How would I do this in JavaScript?

share|improve this question
2  
I can't see how you'd get that error message unless you're destroying the wordCount object before the asynchronous readFile callback has run. –  cookie monster Jan 31 '14 at 18:48
2  
Does if(wordCount[words[i]]) give same error? –  epascarello Jan 31 '14 at 18:48
1  
There clearly is an object, and using in to check for keys in an object shouldn't fail, and when it says the object is undefined, something else is going on here that we're not seeing. –  adeneo Jan 31 '14 at 18:51
2  
Do you really mean for wordCount to be a global variable? –  jfriend00 Jan 31 '14 at 18:52
3  
what about var before wordCount ? –  ncq Jan 31 '14 at 18:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Declare wordCount as a local variable to that function. It is probably getting overwritten elsewhere:

function wordCountDict(filename) {
    var wordCount = {};
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Smart man. Python has got me omitting the vars, not good. –  Scotty Jan 31 '14 at 18:59
    
Yeah, watch out for those global variables. Easy to accidentally create them in javascript (especially if you are used to python) –  forgivenson Jan 31 '14 at 19:01
    
@Scotty: Consider running your code in strict mode. This catches some common mistakes. If your code is in a node module, put "use strict"; at the top of the module. There are some slight behavior differences that will come with strict mode, but I think they're for the better. –  cookie monster Jan 31 '14 at 19:02
1  
@Scotty if you're interested in learning more about how variables work in javascript, this is a really good read: adequatelygood.com/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting.html –  atdrago Jan 31 '14 at 19:03
    
cookie monster, not all of strict mode differences are better, and it's generally a bad advice to turn it on without any understanding what it does –  alex Jan 31 '14 at 19:05

This is a bad idea

for (i in words) {

do not use a for loop to loop through an array! If something is added to the array prototype it will be checked.

  var words = data.split(" ");
  for (var i=0; i<words.length; i++) {

     if(words[i] in wordCount) { 

Next thing, is readFile is asynchronous. If code outide of it resets wordCount to an undefined value, you can get this error. You are better off using a local variable and setting the global value when the looping is done. Also that return false does NOTHING inside the readFile.

function wordCountDict(filename) {
   var tempWordCount = {};
   var inputFile = fs.readFile( root + filename, 'utf8', function( error, data ) {  
      if(error) {
         console.log('error: ', error) 
         return false;
      }

      var words = data.split(" ");
      for (var i = 0; i<words.length; i++) {

         if(words[i] in wordCount) {  // This is where the problem occurs
            wordCount[words[i]]++;
         } else {
            wordCount[words[i]] = 1;
         }
         console.log(words[i]);
      }

      wordCount = tempWordCount;  //set the global variable equal to the local value

   });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it's bad form, but this is not an answer to the question. –  jfriend00 Jan 31 '14 at 18:53
    
@jfriend00: It actually probably is the answer. I think OP has marked the wrong use of in in the question. –  cookie monster Jan 31 '14 at 18:54
    
for-in loops should work on arrays, even if it's generally not a good idea. –  adeneo Jan 31 '14 at 18:55
    
@jfriend00: Then again, maybe not. There's no reason words would be undefined either, and the error message suggests it is indeed the wordCount object. –  cookie monster Jan 31 '14 at 18:55
    
And it is amazing to see my "edited" answer was the actual solution. Code has so many issues... –  epascarello Jan 31 '14 at 19:14

If all you would like to do is check for existance in the object, you can use this:

if(typeof wordCount[words[i]] === 'undefined'){
    ...
}

I would not recommend just using if(wordCount[words[i]]) because technically there could be a property of the object that exists but evaluates to false.

Note that in Javascript doing something like myObject.something is equivalent to myObject['something'] on an object, and that when you use myObject['somethingElse'] you are basically just dynamically adding members to the object. In Javascript, objects can be used like Python dictionaries, but they really aren't the same thing.

share|improve this answer
    
Just like most the other answers, this is wrong too, or at best off topic. The issue was with wordCount being undefined. Yours will fail with a TypeError. –  cookie monster Jan 31 '14 at 19:12

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